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Essential polish cinema

oleh
Essential polish cinema oleh
This list is limited to 100 positions to ensure it remains manageable for anyone wishing to familiarise themselves with Polish cinema from scratch. A bulk of this list consists of entries by recognized and well regarded auteurs like Kieslowski, Wajda, Zanussi and Zulawski — directors responsible for award winning and internationally relevant films. These positions will be familiar to most cinephiles. Instead of including all these titles or indeed an overwhelming number of classic and contemporary examples of the cinema of moral anxiety that defined polish cinematic output for the majority of foreign audiences, this list deliberately… Baca selengkapnya

This list is limited to 100 positions to ensure it remains manageable for anyone wishing to familiarise themselves with Polish cinema from scratch.

A bulk of this list consists of entries by recognized and well regarded auteurs like Kieslowski, Wajda, Zanussi and Zulawski — directors responsible for award winning and internationally relevant films.
These positions will be familiar to most cinephiles.
Instead of including all these titles or indeed an overwhelming number of classic and contemporary examples of the cinema of moral anxiety that defined polish cinematic output for the majority of foreign audiences, this list deliberately limits the amount of entries from each of those acclaimed directors and that genre as a whole.

However it is by design that the list encompasses many examples of box office hits and cult films that set the trends and defined whole generations of Polish cinema goers. Action films by Wladyslaw Pasikowski, popular comedies by Juliusz Machulski and sweeping costume dramas and period pieces by Jerzy Hoffman are all included here to provide a greater cultural context for any viewer interested in Polish cinema.

I have considered carefully whether certain films should be included here for the fear of alienating viewers.

For example, I have questioned the qualities of films like The Deluge (Potop) or the TV mini-series Nights and Days.
These historical epics are significant extensions of their widely popular, literary sources, recycled endlessly through various media and existing now beyond their initial function as allegories of national turmoil and heritage. From technical standpoint they obviously fail to match the scope and grandeur of their Hollywood counterparts but prevail in Polish, popular culture. As such they might be to a large degree impenetrable to western audiences but as they are structured around classic, melodramatic narratives they should be of value to anyone interested in the cinematic landscape of Poland and ultimately should not be excluded in favour of well established examples from well known directors.

In the end I have given as much consideration to the artistic and cinematic merits of any given film as I did to how they fit into a particular zeitgeist or how they helped define it. That’s why Kiler sits comfortably side by side with The Decalogue.

Of course this is neither exhaustive nor definitive effort but it attempts to provide a greater than usual cross selection of titles with less than usual regard for arthouse cinema and its darlings.

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