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a quiet renaissance: the ecology of 'new scottish cinema' (1990-present)

by Jank Anderson
a quiet renaissance: the ecology of 'new scottish cinema' (1990-present) by Jank Anderson
Long in the shadow of Scotland’s towering literary scene, with works such as Waverly, Lanark, and The Wasp Factory, Scottish cinema was something of a non-start. However, from the 1990s onwards a diverse, collaborative ecology quietly became a canon of its own. Johnathon Murray captures this moment: ‘Something strange happened to me in a Glaswegian cinema on an early January afternoon in 1995. Sitting among an unusually large audience, given the time of day, I watched Shallow Grave (Danny Boyle, GB, 1995), a film made in Scotland with substantial creative input from a broad range of Scottish artists. Despite being almost halfway through an… Read more

Long in the shadow of Scotland’s towering literary scene, with works such as Waverly, Lanark, and The Wasp Factory, Scottish cinema was something of a non-start. However, from the 1990s onwards a diverse, collaborative ecology quietly became a canon of its own. Johnathon Murray captures this moment:

’Something strange happened to me in a Glaswegian cinema on an early January afternoon in 1995. Sitting among an unusually large audience, given the time of day, I watched Shallow Grave (Danny Boyle, GB, 1995), a film made in Scotland with substantial creative input from a broad range of Scottish artists. Despite being almost halfway through an undergraduate degree in Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow, no part of the course syllabus could have prepared me for a cinematic experience quite so exotic. After all, in the period between my studies commencing in 1993 and the theatrical release of director Danny Boyle’s debut feature, almost everything published on the subject of Scottish filmmaking bemoaned that activity’s seemingly irremediable rarity. Forsyth Hardy, a notably active figure within domestic film culture since the late 1920s, conceded that, ‘for better or worse… the picture of Scotland on the cinema screen has been painted in the main by producers outwith the country’

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