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American Cinema

by Kim Packard
American Cinema— A series of 13 videos# from the Annenberg Foundation . Produced by the New York Center for Visual History in association with KCET/Los Angeles and the BBC. 1995. ISBN: 1-55946-807-6 American Cinema connects subjects such as history, business, and English with other studies. In addition, it is a perfect vehicle for developing visual and media literacy skills and can be used as a springboard for creative-writing endeavors and media production. Some Quotes: “The trouble with the movie as a business is that it’s an art. And the trouble with the movie as an art is that it’s a business.” “Yesterday’s authenticity is today’s… Read more

American Cinema— A series of 13 videos# from the Annenberg Foundation .

Produced by the New York Center for Visual History in association with KCET/Los Angeles and the BBC. 1995. ISBN: 1-55946-807-6

American Cinema connects subjects such as history, business, and English with other studies. In addition, it is a perfect vehicle for developing visual and media literacy skills and can be used as a springboard for creative-writing endeavors and media production.

Some Quotes:

“The trouble with the movie as a business is that it’s an art. And the trouble with the movie as an art is that it’s a business.”

“Yesterday’s authenticity is today’s artifice.”

“To me, it (the Western)‘s the great American form because it’s so simple and elemental and it represents all the schizophrenia of the American experience. It’s as if we are between myths. The old myth doesn’t really exist anymore and what is the new one that’s going to come down the road… that will be very interesting to see.”

“If the movies are a kind of pop mythology, then it’s true that all mythology basically is a kind of heavenly mirror of what’s going on in society.”

“Great Noir poses the question: Why me?”

“If you go back and look over the plots of film noir, you’ll discover that more than a quarter of the total films have protagonists who identify themselves as war vets and what he discovers when he comes back from the war is not a secure place in society but rather quite the opposite. One sees it, in a sense, as the continuing experience of wartime trauma in a domestic situation.”

“One of the things that came along in fiction was the private detective, the hard boil private detective; he was not a part of the system, it’s a kind of a loner, almost an urban cowboy. You can’t bribe him, you can’t corrupt him, you can’t even seduce him in many cases. This private detective can take you anywhere, you can go down to the ghetto, you can go down into the underground but you can also go in to the haunts of the rich and the famous. He gave you access to almost any level of society.”

“There is no cavalry to come rescue you because the cavalry is also watching television.”


The Night of the Hunter (#187 on the list below)

(Films #79 by Terrence Malick and #80 by Spike Lee are not mentioned in the series. #169 by Todd Rohal, #187 and #188 were also added by me. I have watched about 19% of the films below, including: 02, 04, 07, 09, 12, 13, 14, 17, 20, 22, 27, 33, 35, 40, 45, 47, 53, 57, 60, 78, 79, 80, 90, 91, 97, 110, 112, 131, 138, 147, 163, 169, 172, 173, 178, 187 and 188. Many remaining to be discovered!)

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