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Bastille Day

by Kim Packard
Created on July 15, 2012 Not too sure where this is going but it’s partly nostalgic with films that I hope to watch eventually. A few French films on this list have nothing to do with Bastille Day…. just looking for Marianne , perhaps! French Embassy in the United States- an article on Marianne July 14th in France is the name day for Camille. July 14th-On this day Bastille Day article, Wikipedia Timeline of the French Revolution Timeline for Modernity- MUBI list Literacy and Revolt: Some Empirical Notes on 1789 in France The Music of the French Revolution : “The revolutionary leaders took music seriously – they realised it is a very… Read more

Created on July 15, 2012

Not too sure where this is going but it’s partly nostalgic with films that I hope to watch eventually. A few French films on this list have nothing to do with Bastille Day…. just looking for Marianne , perhaps! French Embassy in the United States- an article on Marianne

July 14th in France is the name day for Camille.
July 14th-On this day


Bastille Day article, Wikipedia

Timeline of the French Revolution
Timeline for Modernity- MUBI list

Literacy and Revolt: Some Empirical Notes on 1789 in France

The Music of the French Revolution : “The revolutionary leaders took music seriously – they realised it is a very useful tool for changing the way people think and feel. In 1795 a school was set up to train bands for the new army, the National Guard. A new law was passed forcing audiences to sing republican hymns in theatres before operas were performed. Composers were encouraged to write revolutionary songs – and between 1789 and 1800 more than 1300 were written.”

Bals des pompiers (on Firemen’s Balls in French)

Some accordion music for the ambience featuring Un Deux Trois and La Guinguette


The July Column with the Spirit of Freedom at the top

Down Blvd. Henri IV- la Garde républicaine au quartier des Célestins


Madeleines…. Proust’s novel Remembrance of Things Past À la recherche du temps perdu and involuntary memory
French chocolate macarons recipe
Brioche Becomes Challah recipe

Houbigant, Perfumer of Marie Antoinette, Empress Josephine and Princess Adelaide

Cut Steel Jewelry : “Becoming fashionable in France circa 1759, cut-steel jewelry was worn as a substitute for donated (or hidden) jewelry when French King Louis XV ‘requested’ that citizens donate their precious gems and jewelry to help fund his military campaigns during the ‘Seven Years War’. The French spurred the English manufacturers in Woodstock and Birmingham with their overwhelming demand for the product.”

Let them eat cake/Qu’ils mangent de la brioche
<< Il y a donc un pays superbe ou le pain s’appelle du gateau, friandise si rare qu’elle suffit pour engendrer une guerre parfaitement fratricide! >>
from Le Spleen de Paris by Baudelaire
Influence of Revolution on the French cuisine -“The Revolution was integral to the expansion of French cuisine, because it effectively abolished the guilds. This meant any one chef could now produce and sell any culinary item he wished.”

River fish fry (in French) “Partout en France, le long des rivières, les guinguettes naissent à la fin du XVIIIème siècle, et se multiplient au XIXème. L’imagerie populaire retient des guinguettes la décontraction, la musique à danser et la petite friture. A tel point que les petits poissons destinés à être frits s’appellent petite friture avant cuisson.”

Influence of the French Revolution on Romanticism Wikipedia article : “Romantic poets such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, and Shelley started to write works for and about the working man; pieces that the common man could relate to. According to Christensen, “To get the real animating principle of the Romantic Movement, one must not study it inductively or abstractly; one must look at it historically. It must be put beside the literary standards of the eighteenth century. These standards impose limits upon the Elysian fields of poetry; poetry must be confined to the common experience of average men… The Romantic Movement then means the revolt of a group of contemporary poets who wrote, not according to common and doctrinaire standards, but as they individually pleased… there are no principles comprehensive and common to all except those of individualism and revolt.””

Les Misérables is an 1862 French novel by author Victor Hugo that is widely considered one of the greatest novels of the nineteenth century. The title is variously translated from the French as The Miserable, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Wretched Poor, or The Victims. Beginning in 1815 and culminating in the 1832 June Rebellion , the novel follows the lives and interactions of several characters, focusing on the struggles of ex-convict Jean Valjean and his experience of redemption.


Place des Vosges, the location of Victor Hugo’s house

French Revolution of 1848

“Who among us has not dreamt, in moments of ambition, of the miracle of a poetic prose, musical without rhythm and rhyme, supple and staccato enough to adapt to the lyrical stirrings of the soul, the undulations of dreams, and sudden leaps of consciousness. This obsessive idea is above all a child of giant cities, of the intersecting of their myriad relations.”
—Dedication of Le Spleen de Paris (1869) by Baudelaire

Thérèse of Lisieux the Little Flower: “Thérèse of Lisieux is the patron saint of aviators, florists, illness(es) and missions. She is also considered by Catholics to be the patron saint of Russia, although the Russian Orthodox Church does not recognize either her canonization or her patronage. In 1927, Pope Pius XI named Thérèse a patroness of the missions and in 1944 Pope Pius XII named her co-patroness of France alongside St. Joan of Arc.”

Bastille Day Military Parade

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