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FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL du JEUNE CINEMA de HYERES: CINEMA DIFFERENT 1973-83

by herb shellenberger
FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL du JEUNE CINEMA de HYERES: CINEMA DIFFERENT 1973-83 by herb shellenberger
Towards a listing of films programmed by Marcel Maze, founder and leader of the Collectif Jeune Cinema, an important organization in the development of experimental cinema in France. Marcel Maze and Jonas Mekas at Hyeres, 1974 (via Senses of Cinema) Collectif Jeune Cinema, 40 Years of Different Cinema (retrieved from Thessaloniki IFF website) Directly inspired by the events of May ’68, it is fair to say that the early 70s were a fertile ground for experimental film in France. The CJC and the Festival International du Jeune Cinéma de Hyères were in the forefront of this burgeoning film culture. What had started with regular screenings at the… Read more

Towards a listing of films programmed by Marcel Maze, founder and leader of the Collectif Jeune Cinema, an important organization in the development of experimental cinema in France.


Marcel Maze and Jonas Mekas at Hyeres, 1974 (via Senses of Cinema)

Collectif Jeune Cinema, 40 Years of Different Cinema (retrieved from Thessaloniki IFF website)

Directly inspired by the events of May ’68, it is fair to say that the early 70s were a fertile ground for experimental film in France. The CJC and the Festival International du Jeune Cinéma de Hyères were in the forefront of this burgeoning film culture. What had started with regular screenings at the Cinémathèque française and at the Café Colbert by Lemaitre and the Lettrists became a concrete effort to infiltrate the French cultural scene.
The first screening of the Collectif Jeune Cinema, organized by Marcel Mazé, was held June 23, 1970 at the Studio du Valde- Grâce in Paris and Mazé was called upon to form a team which could promote a different type of cinema. It was not long before Raphael Bassan, Noël Burch, Luc Moullet, Jean-Paul Cassagnac, Yves-André Delubac, Daniel Geldrech, Maud and Claude Meimon Thiébaut and many others, joined this group.
The newly formed group organized regular weekly screenings as well as special events, inviting filmmakers from the New German Cinema, the London Filmmakers’Co-op and many other countries. It participated at the Festival of Hyères in spring of ‘71 and on the 5 June 1971 the Collectif Jeune Cinema (CJC) cooperative was formally inaugurated, during a General Assembly of “one hundred and fifty filmmakers, including about sixty young directors” (AFP dispatch of June 6, 1971 by journalist Gylaine Guide).
The CJC developed the sections “Cinema of Tomorrow” and “Cinema Différent” at the Festival of Hyères. “Cinema Différent” was initially dominated by early American “underground” but quickly became a showcase for the international experimental film, with a strong focus on French production. This generated articles and radio and television reports which, although not exactly entering the mainstream, managed to reach a great number of movie-goers. The CJC also established its own magazine, Cinema Différent in 1976, with 26 issues published up to 1980.
Experimental and “different film” (a term that has become synonymous with the CJC) was screened, taught, theorized by writers such as Noguez, Bassan, Skorecky, Brunel, Delilia and also exported. Presenting banned films, like Un Chant d’amour by Jean Genet, alongside ground-breaking conceptual approaches, like Tony Conrad’s The Flicker, the screenings of the Collectif Jeune Cinema in the early 70s often had to be repeated by popular demand.
At that time, the “Cinema Différent” section of the Festival of Hyères and the Collectif Jeune Cinema had forged strong links with other festivals and events devoted to the experiment, like the Festival Universitaire de Nancy, Knokke-le-Zoute, Osnabrück, the Berlinale Forum, the Rotterdam IFF and many more. At the same time, other cooperatives or groups were formed in France and were all very involved in the defense, production and promotion of an “other cinema”. From 1989 to 1997, the archive of the CJC was managed by another cooperative.
The new Collectif Jeune Cinema was re-established during the first Festival of Cinema Différent in Paris, in January 1999. Since then, the festival has been taking place annually, every December, to this date. The new CJC has also remained active ever since and, besides hosting the festival, it also archives and distributes experimental films from all over the world, and organizes monthly screenings. What sets the Collectif Jeune Cinema apart from most other similar structures is a dogged determination to offer a wide selection of films which does not only challenge mainstream cinema, but also the homogeneity that in many occasions permeates experimental film today.
—Marcel Maze and Vassily Bourikas

1972 Grand Prix: Deux Fois, Jackie Raynal shared with Pic et Pic et Collegramme, Rachel Weinberg

1973 Grand Prix: Willow Spring, Werner Schroeter
1973 Prix Special du Jury: Imagens do Silencio, Luiz Rosemberg Filho
1973 Prix de la Recherche: Hotel Monterey, Chantal Akerman

1974 Grand Prix: Les Intrigues de Sylvia Couski, Adolfo Arrieta
1974 Prix du Court Metrage: La Femme qui se poudre, Patrick Bokanowski
1974 Prix Special du Court Metrage: Traces, Barbara Linkevitch, ex-aequo: Destiny, The Universal Fantasy, Jon Voorhees and Bruce Carrington
1974 Prix de la Recherche: Room Film, Peter Gidal
1974 Prix de la Critique: Le Cuisinier de Ludwig, Hans-Jurgen Syberberg, ex-aequo: La Soeur du cadre, Jean-Claude Biette
1974 Mention Speciale du Jury: L’Arlequin des rues, Jean-Paul Dupuis, ex-aequo: Telweise von mir ein Volksstuck, Helmut Costard

1975 Grand Prix: Leave Me Alone, Gerhard Theuring
1975 Prix du Court Metrage: F2, Jean Pascal
1975 Prix de la Folie: Modelo, Costas Sficas
1975 Prix de la Porte Entrouverte: Eugenie de Franval, Louis Skorecki
1975 Prix de la Critique: Mozart in Love, Mark Rappaport, ex-aequo: Gaumont Palace, Francois Barat

1976 Grand Prix: Monkey’s Birthday, David Larcher, ex-aequo: La Notte e Il Giorno, Gianni Castagnoli
1976 Prix Special du Jury: Rythme 76, Jean-Michel Bouhours
1976 Prix de la Critique: Sensitometrie, Patrice Kirchhofer

1977 Grand Prix: Lithophonie, Jean-Paul Dupuis, ex-aequo: La Cite des neuf portes, Stephane Marti
1977 Prix Special du Jury: L’Enfant qui a pisse des paillettes, Maria Klonaris & Caterina Thomadaki
1977 Prix de la Critique: Film Russe, Erwin Huppert, ex-aequo: La Cite des neuf portes, Stephane Marti
1977 Mentions Speciales: Teo Hernandez, Jean-Pierre Ceton & Irene Fournier, Jacques Haubois, Pierre Bressan

1978 Grand Prix: Droids, Jean-Pascal Auberge
1978 Prix Special du Jury: Demon de l’analogie, Heinz Emigholz, ex-aequo: Frauenzimmer, Pierre Bressan, ex-aequo: Vestibule: Ken Kobland
1978 Prix de la Critique: Vestibule, Ken Kobland

1979 Grand Prix: Codex, Stuart Pound, ex-aequo: Street Film, Robert Fulton
1979 Prix de la Critique: Codex, Stuart Pound, ex-aequo: Pression, Ljubomir Simunic, ex-aequo: L’ultime dissonance, Daniel Viguier, ex-aequo: Near and Far and Now and Then, Ken Kobland
1979 Prix Jean-Jacques Perron: 3 Couches suffisent, Guy Fihman

1980 Grand Prix: Souterrain, Rotraut Pape
1980 Prix du Puplic: X, Lionel Soukaz, ex-aequo: Serie Noire, Florence de Meredieux
1980 Prix de la Critique: San Francisco Zephir, Bastian Cleve

1981 Grand Prix: Resistance, Ken McMullen
1981 Prix Special du Jury: L’Homme qui ne pouvait voir assez loin, Peter Rose

1982 Grand Prix: Castadiva, Eric de Kuyper
1982 Prix du Public: Pour voir, Patrice Enard, ex-aequo: Equipe de nuit, Robina Rose
1982 Prix de la Fondation Samson Francois pour la meilleure bande son: Lun Hui-le jardin des Ages, Alain Mazars

1983 Grand Prix: Voyage a Travers le sable, Andra Hamelberg
1983 Prix Special du Jury: Relation, Toshio Matsumoto
1983 Hommage Special du Jury: a Yvan Martinac pour l’ensemble de son oeuvre
1983 Prix de la Fondation Samson Francois pour la meilleure bande son: Un Film Facile, Jean-Pierre Valladeau
1983 Prix du Film d’Auteur: Elephant, Jacques Meilleurat
1983 Mentions Speciales du Jury: Impressionnant, Marie-Adam Benga, Visages Perdus, Alain Mazars, Odyssee, Robert Macnaughton

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