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Filmmakers that will keep cinema alive and safe

by Santropez
Filmmakers that will keep cinema alive and safe by Santropez
Someone made a post in the forum declaring that in the future there would be non serious filmmakers. I offered him a list and here it is, hoping it gives me some fun to make it and you like it. Sandro Aguilar Ladies and gentlemen, I introduce you to a film animal; writer/producer/director/editor Sandro Aguilar is one of the leading young filmmakers in Portugal. With colleagues Miguel Gomes, Joao Nicolau and some others he has produced being 36 years old, 22 films, edited 20, written 7, directed eight shorts and one glorious feature called Uprise. However, he doesn’t even have a Wikipedia profile. According to my experience, there is always… Read more

Someone made a post in the forum declaring that in the future there would be non serious filmmakers. I offered him a list and here it is, hoping it gives me some fun to make it and you like it.

Sandro Aguilar
Ladies and gentlemen, I introduce you to a film animal; writer/producer/director/editor Sandro Aguilar is one of the leading young filmmakers in Portugal. With colleagues Miguel Gomes, Joao Nicolau and some others he has produced being 36 years old, 22 films, edited 20, written 7, directed eight shorts and one glorious feature called Uprise. However, he doesn’t even have a Wikipedia profile.

According to my experience, there is always something worth to comment in his films as producer, writer or director. His graphic style with almost no dialogues creates a great atmosphere and mood, specially when he decides to use music (less often than most filmmakers) and perfectly synchronizes the images, the story and the music. For those interested in him, many of his films are available to watch here in MUBI.

Dagur Kári
Born in Paris in 1973 son of an Petur Gunnarsson (famous Icelandic writer) and raised in Iceland, this guy has achieved more in terms of film than many established and famous directors. Dagur graduated from the National film school of Denmark in 1999 with his arthouse short film called Lost Weekend

which later won 11 prizes in different international film festivals. His first feature film Noi Albinoi (2003) won 20 international awards out of 32 nominations including the New Director’s prize in the Edingburgh Film Festival and the Krzysztof Kieslowski Award in the Denver International Film Festival. Later he directed Dark Horse in 2005 and in 2009 his latest film The Good Heart.

Carlos Reygadas

At age 39, Reygadas has already directed three feature films including Silent Light, which compited for the Palme d’Or at the 2007 Cannes Film Festivala not mentioning the Jury Prize at this same festival and other 29 international prizes that this film was awarded with. He is known for the spiritual content in his films, Carlos stays that the first time he felt passion for film was when watching Andrei Tarkovsky’s films as a teenager.
He studied law in Mexico and later got a degree in armed conflicts in London, he had a job in the United Nations but entered the film world until he participated in a film competition in Belgium with his short film Maxhumain.

Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul is perhaps the most promising figure in this list, since he was awarded this year with the Palme d’Or at Cannes for his film Uncle Boonmee who can recall his past lives which is conected to his other films as Tropical Malady and his short film A letter to Uncle Boonmee. His first highly aknowledged worldwide film was Syndromes and a Century, that was as well the first Thai film to enter the competition in the Venice Film Festival.
Apichatpong usually mixes mythology, sexuality and unconventional structures in his scripts, thing that has provoked sensuration for some of his films in Thailand.

Miguel Gomes

Along with his colleague Sandro Aguilar, he is surely the least known of all the filmmakers on this list, Miguel is specially recognized for his films Kalkitos and Our beloved month of august (both produced by Aguilar) and attracted my attention with his short Canticle of all creatures. This short is divided into three singular parts, one that shows the story about St. Francis and nature, another about a young troubadour walking through the streets of a Portuguese town. And at last, a story about animals, all of them are pretty unconventional things to add to a film (maybe exceptuating the troubadour part) and even more if we consider that they are all mixed in the same short.

Lech Majewski

Alright, I know this guy is already 57 years old, and at most, he wil make about 7 films more, but I really had to add Lech to this list.
My first time experiencing his unique art and style was with The Roe’s Room (1998), an opera about a middle/high class family seen through the eyes of the only child. Some great metaphors, and an awesome art direction and cinematography, but what amazed me the most from this film was that Majewski not only directed, but also served as production designer, editor, and the strangest: he co-wrote the opera that plays during the whole film. So, after this there was nothing too spectacular, but indeed a film definitely worth to watch and analyse. I then decided to watch Wojaczek, his 1999 film.

Wojaczek narrates the daily, and strange life of Rafal Wojaczek, a Polish poet born in 1945 whose short existence was marked by alcoholism, strange relationships and suicide attempts. It’s the character’s singular style and the, once again, amazing cinematography that will keep anyone expectative and pleased with what is presented. Now, regarding his film Garden of Earthly Delights, this is really different from the two films I talked about previously; and definitely not easy to sit through, but in all probability worth the time and the effort.

This man has just presented his new film, The mill and the cross in the Sundance Festival, and I’m certainly hoping to get to watch it somehow, someday. The film was based in Pieter Bruegel’s paint Christ carrying Cross, thing that doesn’t tell us what to expect, but however, sounds damn interesting.


From Wojaczek

Directors pending: (Waiting to see enough of their work as to write a paragraph about them.)
Sarunas Bartas
Don Hertzfeldt
Daniel Sánchez Arévalo
Edwin

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