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My official Selection 61 / 100 films --- A project in the making

By: Beneezy

61/100 Favourite films in progress…
Vol. 2.3 / Updated January 3, 2011

61. Lost In Translation / Sofia Coppola / 2003 / United States, Japan / Color
For this, her second feature film, Sofia Copolla wrote the role of Bob for Bill Murray. When she finally tracked him down, all he would say was that he was ‘inclined’ to make the film – and then followed was a new and wondrous Bill Murray. Both acerbic grouch and unwilling romantic of Groundhog Day (1993) are there, but none of the Murray comic schtick. It’s all available, however – that massive reservoir of comic talent lies just below the minimalist, romantic comedy, of manners.. Coppola creates a situation in which a sad Bob and a confused Charlotte can be safe wit each other, where they can relax and find real laughter.

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60. La Moustache / Emmanuel Carrère / 2005 / France / Color
“La Moustache” is a voyage of finding the meaning of oneself. A man filled with confusion and mistrust attempting to determine the truth, spins out of control and doubt his own soundness of mind. Vincent Lindon’s sweet and gentle performance is what makes this film uncanny. Emmanuel Carrère’s first feature film “La Moustache,” is a vulnerably delicate superb psychological mystery.

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59. El Espinazo Del Diablo / Guillermo Del Toro / 2001 / Spain, Mexico / Color
“The Devil’s Backbone” is a top-notch film, visually and poetically, and it accompanies “Pan’s Labyrinth” on one of Del Toro’s masterworks. This film represents destiny, romance, death, loneliness, and companionship and these are only small details of this visually stunning masterpiece from Guillermo Del Toro. The cinematography is magnificent and lavishing. Children faced fear by courage to overcome the sadness and to survive from everything that can harm them. Reminiscent of “Au Revoir Les Enfants” by Louis Malle, as the hatred became friendship and deep within the secret and lies, truth eventually became destined.

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58. A Clockwork Orange / Stanley Kubrick / 1971 / United Kingdom, United States / Color
Stanley Kubrick never made a film that didn’t court controversy, but A Clockwork Orange caused more that all his previous work combined. However, the violence depicted in the film doesn’t seem extreme by modern standards. This masterpiece is stylish, terrifying, influential, brutal, and there are only few adjectives one cannot apply to A Clockwork Orange.

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57. Rushmore / Wes Anderson / 1998 / United States / Color
Anderson’s second film, definitely one of his best,—- masterfully portrays the adolescent age in reality. Anderson crafted this film precisely, that the audiences will notice how unique his talents are. The beautiful images are ravishing, and you can almost take each scene and make it a photograph collage. Murray at his melancholy-best, Schartzman is terrific, and Anderson does what he’s good at, and that’s making a film jewel.

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56. The Haunting / Robert Wise / 1963 / United States, United Kingdom / Black & White
The most likely explanation for the film’s universal success is the presence of legendary director Robert Wise (who fitted it in between West Side Story and The Sound of Music), who is more than just a safe pair of hands. He lends creativity to the much copied and utterly terrifying night-time scenes when whatever presence the house harbours can be heard rumbling up and down the corridors hammering on the walls and doors.

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55. The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford / Andrew Dominik / 2007 / United States, Canada / Color
The harmony that became rivalry in this magnificent story of obsession, lies, and self-importance, as Brad Pitt performed as Jesse James, the nation’s most notorious culprit in the 1880s. Jesse James actions are unlawful, but not in his point of view, some people perceive him as a person with such compassion, tenderness, and kindhearted. This is one of another Roger Deakin’s extraordinarily fine visual presentations in a mildly superb scenes like paintings frame by frame. “The Assassination Of Jesse James” is an important film that presents lack of courage, excessively desirous of life, and truth in reality.

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54. No Country For Old Men / Joel Coen & Ethan Coen / 2007 / United States / Color
No Country For Old Men by the Coen brothers is a classic high quality movie that ranks with the best. The camera shots are well photographed by Roger Deakins, making the film free of dirt and free of roughness. Great choice for not putting any sound or music in the background because it served very well, it sounded pure, forceful, and simple. You can even hear the wind slashing through the empty desert top. Coen brothers made one of the most talked about villains in the history of the film, Antoine Chigur, played by the notoriously great actor, Javier Bardem. Also one of my favorite actors, Josh Brolin, played the most important character in the movie, as he connect the audience with other characters. The performances in this film were superb.

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53. The Apartment / Billy Wilder / 1960 / United States / Black & White
Billy Wilder very skilfully sets up the funny side of The Apartment’s scenario before peeling the humour away, layer by layer, till we see the bleakness beneath. An optimistic streak, however, is maintained by the honestly cheerful Miss Kubelik until her own world becomes too grim. Jack Lemmon seems to have been liberated by his portrayal as Daphne in Some Like It Hot (1959). He finds new depths, as C.C. Baxter, that allow him to forge the perfect balance between the film’s comic top layer and its darker implications. Shirley MacLaine was perfectly cast as his co-star, and ended a run of disappointing movies with an Oscar nomination.

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52. Mulholland Drive / David Lynch / 2001 / United States, France / Color
Dreams are dreams, but when it comes to David Lynch, dreams are reality. “Mulholland Drive” is Lynch’s finest masterpiece in my opinion. With beautifully slow paced dialogue and magnificent dream sequences. What more can you ask for when you see a masterwork that exhibits a wholly obsession like no other in a gut-wrenching emotional performances by Naomi Watts and Laura Harring? Exactly! This film changed the way I looked at cinema. It showed more reality than what dreams are supposed to appear like. An amazing experience from start to end. This film is Lynch’s magnum opus!

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51. It Happened One Night / Frank Capra / 1934 / United States / Black & White
The smartest, funniest, and loveliest romantic comedy film of all time in my opinion is Frank Capra’s “It Happened One Night.” People might not agree with me on this one but I really adored this movie.It’s actually the first movie ever to win the five major academy awards in 1934 as you’ll see on the synopsis. Very mature kind of humor is what makes this film great. Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert were amazing in this movie. Well it shows why because they won the academy awards for their roles. One of Capra’s most personal work because of its difficulties throughout the making of this film. It’s a must see, must have movie in your collection. “It happened one night,” still shines ever since its released.

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50. Das Weisse Band / Michael Haneke / 2009 / Germany, Austria, France / Black & White
Chilling, disturbing, and ravishing can describe this magnificent picture from a great director, Michael Haneke. Haneke’s “The White Ribbon”, set in Germany 1913, follows the story of an assemblage village full of deceit, lies, and malice. Each scenes are unique and precisely done with masterful skills that only Haneke possesses. The film explains death intelligible, demonstrates the power of a man with no apprehensive about, and identifies the reality of indisputable proposition. Berger’s cinematography captures the immense environment with the competent excellence in performance. Black and white film can never be richer than “The White Ribbon.” This is Haneke’s greatest piece of work, crafted with such sharpness and distress sensation like no other. Ausgezeichnet!

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49. There Will Be Blood / Paul Thomas Anderson / 2007 / United States / Color
There Will Be Blood —-an insanely beautiful picture from Paul Thomas Anderson. This film can arguably be the best film of the 21st century by far. After seeing There Will Be Blood for the second time since the day it came out of the theater, I have to say that it still gave me a freshly and satisfying feeling that I’ve felt when I first saw this film. An amazing cinematography by Robert Elswit will leave you breathless from one moment to another. Paul Dano as Eli Sunday incredibly played the mentally calmed but powerful character opposing Daniel Plainview as Daniel Day-Lewis, who gave an eerie performance that garnered him an Oscar for Best Actor. It’s a must see, must have gorgeous masterwork that will stand the test of time.

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48. Sommarnattens Leende / Ingmar Bergman / 1955 / Sweden / Black & White
The script of the film is extremely intense for a comedy picture. This is one of those films that gives you a chance to explore what directors are trying to achieve by capturing our minds and blending it into his or her’s perspective without hesitation or desire to make us suffer within one’s heart. It’s a lovely comedic screw-ball film that attracts different people with different mental view or prospect. A great gift from a brilliant director of the 20th century-Ingmar Bergman, not to miss. The visuals are still almost perfect, and the dialogues are all over the place but stays in one particular section, these are Bergman’s trademark. This is a must see for any movie addicts out there. “Smiles Of A Summer Night” will leave you a warm feeling and a beautiful smile to go along with your calm sensations.

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47. Umberto D. / Vittorio De Sica / 1952 / Italy / Black & White
Life is short and difficult, but if you are happy, you’ve got it all. That’s how I view this masterwork from Vittorio De Sica. Life will eventually struggle some time in our lives, everyone must have a companion in order for us to go on. Umberto D. only had Flike, his dog, his only comrade. Though he struggled, Umberto still tried to connect with his partner. Emotionally suffered by his actions towards everyone who obstructs him, the only way he can get away was to let go. To leave everything he’s got, and might risk a life. Life that was too precious during that time, where a companion was very needed. Umberto and Flike lived, together. A masterpiece of reality.

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46. Ultimo Tango A Parigi / Bernardo Bertolucci / 1972 / Italy / Color
Marlon Brando means beautiful acting! Wait, did I say that right? I think I did. The greatest actor of his generation, Brando soars all the way to the top on this one. Bertolucci’s quintessential masterpiece illustrates the loneliness of a man, and the sexual desires of a woman in “Last Tango in Paris.” What an amazing experience watching this slow pace piece of art. Your hair will go up with the performances and with the fictitious tale as well. I can watch this film over and over and over again and again and again.

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45. Sullivan’s Travels / Preston Sturges / 1942 / United States / Black & White
“Sullivan’s Travels” is Preston Sturges’ best film in my opinion. Joel McCrea and Veronica Lake’s onscreen relationship quite simply ‘astonishes’ lovers of comedies, including myself! This is a story of a saddened wealthy man, whose trying to escape the web of loneliness. Also a search about happiness and finding the true value of laughter. A great quantity of money can never buy happiness in this screwball comedy from Struges that makes a truthful view on how people suffer with affluence.

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44. M / Fritz Lang / 1931 / Germany / Black & White
A disorderly crowd of people and a proud law enforcement officers are to capture a maniacal murderer, who causes the society to panic and worry about the dangers that can happen to their families, but it would not be easy for those searchers to do so. Desperate for their lives, beggars and the law enforcement collide to find the murderer. Fritz Lang’s back and forth camera shots are superbly fantastic. Lang created one of the creepiest psychos ever put on film. One scene, I felt an urge to help out find the killer, but soon I sympathized Peter Lorre’s character. A trapped man who cannot stop his own feelings, but can only run away through a boundless nowhere. Lorre’s insanely acting is scarier than his character’s image. “M” is a suspenseful beauty of a film that shows a chilling tormented evil inside a man’s mind and consciousness.

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43. Amarcord / Federico Fellini / 1974 / Italy / Color
I felt like I was in Italy after seeing “Amarcord” for the first time. Fellini definitely brought out the freshness of Italy’s provinces during the fascist era. What an amazing picture. Superb film-making by one of the greatest directors who ever lived. The colors of this film are vivid, and the direction is in perfection. Federico Fellini does not disappoint, but gives an awesome freedom to understand the view of his past. This is one of Fellini’s finest films.

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42. Il Conformista / Bernardo Bertolucci / 1970 / Italy, France, Germany / Color
Visually tasty, this film by Bertolucci. Another masterpiece under his belt. With Vittorio Storaro’s lovely, top notch, ravishing cinematography, you might as well eat this piece of film. But the thing that stands out is the storyline, a suspense thriller made especially for people who loves films. The reality of the desire of revenge crawls all over the place in this film, but manages to concentrate only on the important part of everyday lives. Savvy.

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41. Noise / Tony Spiridakis / 2004/ United States / Color
I’ve never been so irritated watching a film in my life until I saw “Noise,” by Tony Spiridakis. I felt like I was being tortured as much as the woman protagonist, who recently got divorced and who also had to deal with insanely loud noises in her apartment. There’s a part in this movie where a therapy scene got uncontrollably annoying that so I needed to escape as she did and I turned off the television because I couldn’t handle the situation the way she couldn’t handle hers. Though it never bothered me to watch films about human being having such problems that they turn into monsters in terms of their mindset, “Noise” uniquely manage to pester me in a disturbing way. “Noise” is a very well written film with a magnificent performance from a motion picture debutant Trish Goff. There’s a great scene where Goff was talking to her neighbor, who causes the loud noises in the apartment, telling her that she shouldn’t be punished for anything, and that she is a human being who deserves peace and quiet. I think, as a human being, that we will never find that peace and quiet if we do not understand the people around us. This is a disturbing masterful film about annoyance and repugnance in life.

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40. Aguirre, Der Zorn Gottes / Werner Herzog / 1972 / Germany / Color
First of all, Werner Herzog’s “Aguirre, The Wrath Of God,” is not only a masterpiece but also an essential film. Secondly, the expedition of Aguirre and his men was an illusion, therefore all the aspects throughout this film made me a pessimist. I saw anger, hatred, greediness, etc. that covered the whole voyage very difficult for Aguirre and his men to grasp. Misfortune was on Aguirre’s side because of selfishness. There was an important scene where an Indian slave was playing the bamboo flute and Aguirre was staring down at him, not caring whatever comes in his way and embracing everything around him, which I personally think, symbolizes courage and insanity. Another great scene was when the black slave, the emperor, and the pilgrim were talking about their goals and what they have to achieve on the journey after everything is settled. The slave was to be free, the emperor was to seize gold, and the pilgrim was to spread the words of God. It amazes me how clearly each person see what’s ahead of them but could not foresee the certainty of death. Herzog created a surreal haunting film and an eerie image of an insane man.

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39. L.A. Confidential / Curtis Hanson / 1997 / United States / Color
While L.A. Confidential is imbued with much of the mood and tradition of film noir, it doesn’t have the feel of a period piece. Hanson weaves a tangled storyline, but razor-sharp characters and excellent timing mean that following the plot is a great ride. As you watch the film it is difficult not to be drawn into the lush sights and sounds of Ellroy’s Los Angeles, which is at times cynical but always seductive.

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38. Singin’ In The Rain / Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly / 1952 / United States / Color
Whenever I see the film “Singin’ In The Rain,” it always reminds me of my childhood, growing up dancing and singing in the rain. This film never seem to disappoint me, yet it gives me a whole other feeling in an amusement way that sometimes I cannot describe. This film is the greatest musical film ever, and most people would agree with me in terms of the performances that Gene Kelly had provided. Kelly’s performance can never be forgotten because of his charisma and confidence. “Singin’ In The Rain” will be cherished for infinite times because of its rich presentation and undying excellence.

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37. Der Himmel Uber Berlin / Wim Wenders / 1987 / Germany / Color, Black & White
Human problems such as fear of death, suicide, cry, search for feelings, loneliness, lack of desire and pleasure, war, life in different mentality, change, unforgettable past, trouble, pain, and anger are all parts of this extraordinary film of beautiful and imaginative thoughts. This film is a happiness like a song, a never ending survival, a cleanliness of one’s heart, witnessing the inner nothing, temptation of goodness, and remembering the childhood. The dark and light line makes a fine line, also the differences of everyone explains more to life than just life itself, and also the excitement of finding the unknown reality. “Wings Of Desire” is a love story of a fine line between loneliness and happiness, eternity, peaceful, age, and decision. Wim Wenders created the most far-fetched film-making experience of all statement of human details. A masterpiece with the composition of connection and infinite lives of human being.

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36. The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre / John Huston / 1948 / United States / Black & White
John Huston’s “The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre,” is an adventure film in which the pursuit made is not an end in itself but the excuse for a fatalistic character study in which the moral differences between an older wiser man, and the mistrustful, middle-aged man become downright apparent, and between the younger man must decide.This is one of the best films that examines the greed that gradually gets the better of good people. This is one of Bogart’s incredible performances, uniquely about paranoia that spirals into madness, and the breaking of the bond with other characters created a frenzy atmosphere that only Huston can furnish.

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35. Le Violon Rouge / François Girard / 1998 / Canada, Italy, United Kingdom / Color
What do you do when the most perfect thing that you want just comes in to your life?, asked Charles Morritz, played by one of the most distinguished actors of this time, Samuel L. Jackson. No one can clearly answer the question Morritz asked. It is impossible, in contrast to the certainty of death in human life. “The Red Violin’s” beautiful narration starts off with birth, love, and compelling emotions. However, the story cautiously makes it way towards hatred, greed, and death. The capability of something valuable can never take away the desire of a person that draws them into it. “The Red Violin” openly guides us into this tantalizing object of love and death, furthermore allows us to recognize the importance of a long-lost passion. This is a magnum-opus of visual and musical collage by François Girard.

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34. Ran / Akira Kurosawa / 1985 / Japan / Color
Master filmmaker Akira Kurosawa’s version of Shakespeare’s King Lear, that took ten years to arrive the screen, and was the most expensive film ever made in Japan, was successfully made and maybe even better than the previous versions, or can arguably be called the greatest adaptation about greed, betrayal, and disloyalty. It all ended in satisfaction and begun in a madness that progressed into conflicts, “Ran” (meaning ’Chaos’) was the obsolete masterpiece with vigor and energy. “Ran” was also the film that propelled Kurosawa as one of the greatest orchestrator of staging epic battle scenes in films!

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33. Schindler’s List / Steven Spielberg / 1993 / United States / Color, Black & White
I was seven years old when I saw this movie. I’m pretty sure this was the film that got me involved into being a devoted moviegoer, a true cinephile. But enough about me, let’s talk about “Schindler’s List.” This film is heartbreaking from beginning to finish. Steven Spielberg’s true masterpiece about life, death, and survival. I cannot say anymore how great this film is. The black and white picture with its little color blended in it just makes it even more melancholy than already is. Spielberg really does know how to make the viewers suffer emotionally without hurting them physically. A classic art!

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32. The Bridge On The River Kwai / David Lean / 1957 / United States, United Kingdom / Color
The Bridge on the River Kwai was based on the best-selling novel by Pierre Boulle, out of which David Lean fashioned a spectacle of brilliant set-pieces, at the same time forcing audiences to question their received ideas about individual courage and responsibility. Such is this film’s cunning that we have been encouraged to identify with Guinness’s character to the point that we, too, resist the demolition of the bridge, a structure that can only aid the enemy. Superbly cast, especially Guinness, who is a personification of courage and stubbornness, the film was distinguished by a narrative and visual sweep.

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31. Chinatown / Roman Polanski / 1974 / United States / Color
Another reason why Roman Polanski is one of the smartest film directors in the history of the cinema is because he does not only emphasize the story but the characters as well. Jack Nicholson at his prime. John Huston’s best supporting performance. And Faye Dunaway on top of her career. This movie changed the perspective of the film noir’s experience through dialogue. A masterwork!

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30. Pulp Fiction / Quentin Tarantino / 1994 / United States / Color
Now, “Pulp Fiction” is just insanely crazy. Yes, I said it, it’s freaking awesome! Tarantino’s masterwork never gets old, and never will. With all the great casts in this film, it still shocked the whole world with its unique direction, witty dialogue, and memorable lines. How could someone not like this film? Come on now, You best believe me that if you have never seen this film, and you’re reading my review, then just get out of here. You don’t deserve to be here on the Auteurs. Ha ha just joking. But really though, please see this film, I’m begging you. “Le Big Mac.” –

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29. Ivanovo Detstvo / Andrei Tarkovsky / 1962 / Soviet Union / Black & White
I’m glad that “Ivan’s Childhood” was my first Tarkovsky experience. I was so touched by this film that I compassionately sympathized for the protagonist. The missing part of Ivan’s life was the warmheartedness of the people around him, though he openly accepted some affection in his life, it still wasn’t enough for him to live it. Tarkovsky’s masterful direction examines a great deal of emotions so uncontrolled with violent situations that resulted in clear anguish and pure grief within a child.

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28. Russkiy Kovcheg / Aleksander Sokurov / 2002 / Russia / Color
What beauty! A tour de force! Lavishing! I was in a whole other level filled with delightful people and ravishing paintings. I traveled on my chair while watching “Russian Ark.” The presentation could not be more realistic than this film itself. What a magnificent direction by Alexander Sokurov. This one single take of the entire movie made me feel like I was a part of the masterfully orchestrated play. The paintings looked so beautiful that I thought I was actually looking at them face to face in a museum. I can still smell the vivid images portrayed here on this film. There are no other film so perfectly choreographed like the “Russian Ark.” Watching this picture was my first trip to heaven-like, easygoing environment, and beautiful architecture as it allowed me to freely accept the gracefulness of its objects and surroundings. What more admiration can i say about this film? Did it give me joy watching it? Was I overwhelmed with emotions and excitement? Maybe yes and maybe yes! I’ve never been so close to an empire, a power, a royalty and beauty. I imagined myself reading a history book about Russia in the 18th century and dreamt about this adventure! The slight humor didn’t bother me at all, yet it made me adore the film even more because of its luxury and regal splendour. A labyrinth of beauty and enchantment, I was free just like the narrator and i just had to dream away, and live forever!

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27. Easy Rider / Dennis Hopper / 1969 / United States / Color
Easy Rider – the ultimate road movie that launched a thousand more. The cinematography is crafted to back up the whole essence of the film and it works wonderfully as a means of reiterating the central themes of freedom and escapism. However, when death is the ultimate price for a sense of freedom, the viewer is asked to question the ethics of opting out of the mainstream and going solo.

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26. Magnolia / Paul Thomas Anderson / 1999 / United States / Color
Magnolia is as challenging and evolutionary a film as one could hope for. Anderson’s three hour film will try the patience of anyone dead-set on a single unifying story, but fans of ambitious cinema that fudges with narrative traditions are in for a treat. In addition to being uniquely excellent, the performances have moments for the foreground reel.

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25. Psycho / Alfred Hitchcock / 1960 / United States / Black & White
Hitchcock’s masterpiece of terror hasn’t dated a bit in the years since its release. The ominous opening chords of Bernard Herrmann’s now famous theme (set against the stylish credit design of Saul Bass) makes our hearts beat faster, as well as making it immediately clear that whatever lies ahead, it’s not going to be agreeable to any of the characters…But Hitchcock intended to mislead us from the start. For the first half hour of the film is a straight crime thriller, featuring an established star on the run for embezzlement - classic Hitchcock material that comfortably fits the assumptions one might have had upon entering the cinema.

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24. Some Like It Hot / Billy Wilder / 1959 / United States / Black & White
Nothing in Some Like It Hot – an all-time favourite film – fails. Despite all the reported problems of working with ‘dazed and confused’ Marilyn, the outcome is superb. Wilder even manages to get Shakespearean, playing Sugar and Junior as high comedy, and Daphne and Osgood as the clowns. The best drag movie till Tootsie (1982) – and maybe then some.

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23. The Searchers / John Ford / 1956 / United States / Color
The Searchers is perhaps John Ford’s masterpiece, and the last of the golden era of classical Westerns begun with Stagecoach (1939). The Western had matured and become less black-and-white (in both senses) since then, and so had John Wayne’s character. Ethan, Ford’s only real anti-hero, played by Wayne with complete conviction, is a complex, obsessive man, a mixture of good and bad. The stunning colour photography, the wonderful vistas of Monument Valley and Max Steiner’s moving score are all part of the sensual pleasure of the film.

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22. Citizen Kane / Orson Welles / 1941 / United States / Black & White
Citizen Kane did not win the academy award for best picture but it is arguably the best film ever made. People usually talk about how Welle’s camera direction ran smoothly and almost perfectly that they forget about the great performances by the characters. Citizen Kane is the only movie in my opinion that display more genre than any other films in history. The shot movements are superb, performances are flawless, and Orson Welles sprinkled this film with infinite classic moments.

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21. Taxi Driver / Martin Scorsese / 1976 / United States / Color
Scorsese’s true masterpiece. The man who suffers loneliness expresses his feelings towards his surroundings, but fail to be happy. De Niro’s performance is one of the creepiest, smartest, and stupendous acts ever put on film. Lost in his mind, his world crashing down, he still managed to tear his soul apart little by little, making him dangerous to everything around him. This film is about twisted mind that does not need help to a certain extent, and to die rather than to yield. A masterpiece!

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20. The Third Man / Carol Reed / 1949 / United Kingdom / Black & White
If you have ever seen Citizen Kane and The Third Man, there is no doubt you will notice that neither films is much different—-screen wise. Robert Krasker’s brilliant lighting made the characters come to life as well as the location in this splendid, gorgeous film.The mentally deranged score by Karas is one of the best, if not the greatest score ever put on film noir screen. And of course give credit to the vivid directing of the unrivaled Carol Reed. After their success in Citizen Kane(1941), Welles and Cotten were united to make the “Third Man” a first-rate film noir. A remarkable film to see.

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19. Blade Runner / Ridley Scott / 1982 / United States / Color
The first and possibly the best Philip K. Dick adaptation, Blade Runner is an arresting triumph of design, atmosphere, and storytelling. Ridley Scott’s self-assured approach lends a convincing air to the year 2019, making the city’s neon-lit streets seem as real as possible. From character to narrative, to the shadowy visual style, Blade Runner is riddled with film noir references. Available in two versions, the superior is the 1991 director’s cut which removes a dreadful commentary — insisted upon by the distributor - begrudgingly and lazily recorded by Harrison Ford.

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18. La Strada / Federico Fellini / 1954 / Italy / Black & White
Giulietta Masina performed one of the most beautiful and difficult characters ever filmed in the history of the cinema. This film belongs to her, not only because of her performance, but the richness of her presence in the movie. La Strada is captivating! It illustrates the emotions that cannot be expressed, the happiness that cannot be understood in a certain way, and the sadness that spreads everywhere. A heartbreaking powerful film.

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17. Au Revoir Les Enfants / Louis Malle / 1987 / France / Color
One of the finest films about childhood’s deprivation. Two friends that showed courage and affection with each other and the warmness of this film describes how emotional a child between infancy and adolescence can be. A melancholy film—breaks my heart every time i see it. Louise Malle gave us this masterwork to cherish, love, and understand. No other film can be powerfully, emotionally, and beautifully moving than “Au Revoir Les Enfants.”

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16. C’era Una Volta Il West / Sergio Leone / 1968 / Italy, United States / Color
Once Upon A Time In The West is a compendium of almost every Western ever made, this amorality tale of epic grandeur is the apotheosis of the Sergio Leone style of long lingering shots and meaningful close-ups. Skillfully using natural sound — water drops, footsteps, squeaky door hinges and a buzzing fly - the tension is immediately built up in the first fifteen minutes as a trio of villains descend on a train station, awaiting their prey. Much of the effect of this lyrical and bloody film comes from the music of Ennio Morricone, as important as any character, making the movie into a quasi-opera.

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15. The Maltese Falcon / John Huston / 1941 / United States / Black & White
The style of the movie has everything to do with making it a success. The plot and action are tight but the main attraction is the characters. The way in which the actors bring them to life is sublime to watch. Violence is implicit but it is not seen, instead every nuance of the hard men’s speech and attitude is imbued with their strength and brutality.

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14. Letyat Zhuravli / Mikhail Kalatozov / 1957 / Soviet Union / Black & White
“Love is a harmless mental illness.” These details are what this film is about: Courage and happiness are visible when two people know they have nothing but each other. Sometimes people do serious things in any kind of situation not realizing that it’s too late to turn back time. Rain or shine, human beings must carry on with their lives even though the grudge inside can hurt them. People become foolish when terrible things get in the way of their most cherished passion. However, sometimes they take it too far where normality becomes their pure madness for they get trapped and no one can blame them for their consequences. “The Cranes Are Flying” has one of the most beautiful orchestrated camera shots I have ever seen on screen as it contained heartbreaking compositions in an exceptional brilliance. “The Cranes Are Flying” is definitely one of the greatest films of all time.

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13. 2001: A Space Odyssey / Stanley Kubrick / 1968 / United States / Color
Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” is one of the most visualizing films ever made. The silent-esque film captivates the beauty of the open world. With its crisp and clean cinematography and the brilliance of Kubrick, this film can very well be called the most beautiful film ever made. The techniques used in this film were insanely precise that will blow your mind while watching it and your eyes will take all the out of this world ravishing scenes. Applaud Mr. Kubrick for this masterwork!

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12. Tôkyô Monogatari / Yasujiro Ozu / 1953 / Japan / Black & White
Yasujiro Ozu’s “Tokyo Story” expresses thoughts and feelings most people possesses with such deep insight in a familiar relationship that most of us have to face. This film has done with mastery skills that only Ozu can accomplish. Ozu’s camera movements are delicate, precise, and skillful that his audience would feel they belong in the film with the characters. Performers in this film are incredibly and exceptionally outstanding, you may not notice that you are watching a film, but looking at real people. One of the greatest films of all time, Tokyo Story stands the test of time. A must have, must see for everyone and personally, I can only say this much because this film has been praised with such respect by almost everyone worldwide.

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11. Apocalypse Now / Francis Ford Coppola / 1979 / United States / Color
“Apocalypse Now” can arguably be the best, if not the greatest war film of all time. The magnificent direction of Coppola in this war film soars so high that many modern war film directors cannot and will not level with. Watching “Apocalypse Now” is like going on a trip to your favorite place and just living the life with extreme memorable experiences that are hard to forget. The presence of Marlon Brando in this film adds depth and creepiness that will take over your mind and body. This is another masterwork from Coppola that will stand the test of time.

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10. Det Sjunde Inseglet / Ingmar Bergman / 1957 / Sweden / Black & White
Although “The Seventh Seal” is dealing with a subject so dark and bleak, the film is thought-provoking and directed with such skill that the viewer is drawn in and fogets the depressing issues that are being played out on screen. Bergman was a master of this broody genre of film making, always exploring the complexities of human existence and religious beliefs. A Bergman masterwork!

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9. Otto E Mezzo / Federico Fellini / 1963 / Italy / Black & White
This movie is insane!!! the camera shots are perfectly well balanced and the timing of each characters are very fluid, even the extras are flowing with the camera. The performances are very much underrated. This is my favorite Fellini film, and it’s one of his finest. The beginning scene is probably the best “opening scene” ever put in the cinema’s history, in my opinion. I felt that I was in the actual film with Fellini directing myself and just telling me to roll with the beautiful flow of his masterpiece. Fellini created a classic with his intelligence and brilliance that was imitated but not duplicated. Bravo!

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8. The Godfather / Francis Ford Coppola / 1972 / United States / Color
At its simplest, The Godfather is a film about a conflict within the Mafia, in fact, though, that conflict is simply the stage that Coppola uses to set out what he is really interested in; loyalty, family, and, most importantly, power. One of Coppola’s neatest tricks is how he creates sympathy for the heroes and makes us care about them. No mean feat given the nature of their business, but this is achieved through limiting the scope of the film, most of which takes place in a family setting; wedding, baptism, home and business. The whole cast is wonderful but Brando, in particular, is faultless - powerful and utterly compelling.

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7. Sunset Blvd. / Billy Wilder / 1950 / United States / Black & White
“Sunset Blvd.” ruled!!! Mr. Billy Wilder’s masterpiece is one of the greatest films ever made about Hollywood. Too many classic moments to name, but the one that comes up to mind are the performances of Gloria Swanson and William Holden. The pace of this film is near perfect, the dialogue is crafted with delicate brilliance, and the direction is at the finest. I do not know what else to praise, each scene is very interesting from beginning to end. What a great experience of a top notch film making.

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6. Touch Of Evil / Orson Welles / 1958 / United States/ Black & White
This is my favorite Welles’ film, “Touch Of Evil.” The cinematography and Welles’ virtuoso camera work make “Touch Of Evil” a taut and well-paced thriller. The subtlety of his direction gives the film an intimate feel and nervous atmosphere. “Touch Of Evil” was Welles’ last film as a director in Hollywood, and as one of the highlights of his career it is as unforgettable and spectacular as the climax of the film itself.

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5. On The Waterfront / Elia Kazan / 1954 / United States / Black & White
Marlon Brando was at the height of his career when he starred in this film, something which must have had a huge impact on its initial success and enduring popularity. However his performance was stand-alone and it was talent not fame that really drove home the message and still has people today talking about the film in terms of classic. And with classic lines such as ‘I coulda been a contender,’ its fate is undoubtedly sealed for many years to come. On The Waterfront is still my favorite Marlon Brando film of all time.

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4. Ladri Di Biciclette / Vittorio De Sica / 1948 / Italy / Black & White
Vittorio De Sica’s “Bicycle Thieves” expresses emotions through the truth and reality. De Sica makes us feel sorry for the characters and make us involve where no other film-makers can. A strong melancholy film this is, shows not only the realness of the world, but how people deal with their lives through an obstacle of different problems that cannot be solved. I personally loved this film when I first seen it, and it moves me in a very emotional way everytime I watch it. However, it gives me a happy and warmth feeling in the end because I know that everything happens for a reason and that life is unpredictable.

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3. Vertigo / Alfred Hitchcock / 1958 / United States / Color
It is hard to explain what the main genre of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo” after seeing it for the first time. The first half of the film is no doubt a mystery, with James Stewart following and chasing after Kim Novak, trying to find every answer Stewart can get. Hitchcock’s brilliant directing, powerfully conveys this mystery into a romance film. Of course this movie is a thriller/suspense as well because it wouldn’t be Hitchcock’s film if didn’t have these genres. Vertigo is a very intense picture with every perfect details attached to it, and its countless classic moments. After i watched the film, I could not get Kim Novak’s beautiful face out of my mind. I guess I fell in love with her as much as Stewart’s character did. Vertigo is a must see for everyone. No doubt this movie should be on top lists of every film collectors. It’s a beautiful but extremely melancholy masterpiece not to miss.

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2. La Passion De Jeanne D’Arc / Carl Th. Dreyer / 1928 / France / Black & White
“The Passion Of Joan Of Arc” is arguably the best, if not the greatest “silent” film ever made and greatest film of all time. This film was done with precise emotional level that no other film has. Joan Of Arc is the most visualizing film I have ever seen, not only does it serves emotional expressions, it also delivers one of the greatest acting ever put on film. Renée Falconetti blew out my little brain with her fantastic, hands down, greatest, the best, on top, can’t and won’t reach acting by any actors and actresses. Carl Th. Dreyer has made the most ravishing film, and that is “The Passion Of Joan Of Arc.” Beautiful. Beautiful. And Beautiful.

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1. The Fountain / Darren Aronofsky / 2006 / United States / Color
The power of this film demonstrate the human’s emotional take on life and death. “Death is the road to awe.” simple as that, but difficult to understand. I have never been moved by such an amazing film, so much that it made me cry. Darren Aronofsky has never been a filmmaker who takes the simple way. His previous works have been challenging and command a little suspension of uncertainty from the audience. And It’s always refreshing to be in the hands of a filmmaker with a unique vision, and a pleasure to be challenged by a film’s difficult obstacle of imagination. The Fountain is masterful on so many unusual levels, introducing a demanding film-going experience that should derive a grand sense of wonderment on an unworldly and passionate level.

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Picture of Paddy Fairfax

Paddy Fairfax

28Dec11

it's called 8 1/2 not 'otto e mezzo' because, believe or not, they actually have the same numbers as we do in italy, it's not called 'eight and a half' in english speaking countries and it's not 'otto e mezzo' in italy. sorry that really annoyed me, other than that great list, well done!

Picture of Evan Pasquali

Evan Pasquali

22Oct11

Love the list, even though I don't agree with your number one choice. That's why its your list. Great work.

Beneezy likes this

Picture of STALIN RAJESH

STALIN RAJESH

17Sep11

great list dude but missing 2 great movies 1.IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE 2.MEMENTO

  • Picture of Beneezy

    Beneezy

    5Jan12

    I haven't updated this list yet. In the mood for love is in it though.

Picture of Andhika Eka Buana

Andhika Eka Buana

9Apr10

heven't see your list for a long time, and now The Fountain is at number 1 ! Kudos for you, man