Try 7 days free

Now showing

Film of the day
Exclusive
Festival Focus: Locarno Film Festival

ECHO

Rúnar Rúnarsson Iceland, 2019

In his confidently unconventional, jigsaw-like Echo, Rúnar Rúnarsson (Sparrows) pieces together a variegated portrait of contemporary Iceland: a spectrum of assorted approaches, scenes, styles, and genres that are continually surprising yet always fascinating. A highly enjoyable and humane film.

New Brazilian Cinema
Specials
New Brazilian Cinema

THE FEVER

Maya Da-Rin Brazil, 2019

While making documentaries in the Amazon, Maya Da-Rin developed, over six years, the idea for this film. Indigenous people’s lives and beliefs are conveyed rather than exposed in this moving, hypnotic work about a father and his soon-departing daughter. Winner of the Best Actor Award at Locarno!

A WOMAN'S REVENGE

Rita Azevedo Gomes Portugal, 2012

From auteur Rita Azevedo Gomes comes this ghostly, elegantly-shot adaptation of the 19th century classic Les diaboliques. Featuring a thrilling performance by Rita Durão, A Woman’s Revenge echoes both Manoel de Oliveira’s late-period movies and the bold filmmaking of Eugène Green.

LE WEEK-END

Roger Michell United Kingdom, 2013

A British comedy can still be funny outside of its country! The perfect example is Le Week-End, which elegantly and delightfully swerves between the feelings of hate and love, between lightness and reflection, as it follows a long-term couple rediscovering their attraction in the French capital.

OUR TIME

Carlos Reygadas Mexico, 2018

Carlos Reygadas’ cinema is one of meticulous observation and grandiose revelations. Casting himself and his real-life wife, the Mexican auteur boldly explores—with spellbinding visuals—the dark corners of relationships, dissecting patriarchy along the way. A domestic drama of majestic proportions.

THE PRESIDENT'S LAST BANG

Im Sang-soo South Korea, 2005

A dark comedy at heart, incisive filmmaker Im Sang-soo (The Housemaid) upends conspiracy thrillers in this political satire. Rather than investigating motives, the film ruffled feathers with its humor and profanity—resulting in censorship and libel suits at the time of its release.

AWAARA

Raj Kapoor India, 1951

Raj Kapoor’s watershed film belongs to the Golden Age of Hindi cinema, combining multiple genres and serving as a social critique of class in newly independent India. A milestone in introducing global audiences to Bollywood, the film also launched Kapoor’s illustrious Chaplinesque character.

AGAIN ONCE AGAIN

Romina Paula Argentina, 2019

What happens to a woman when daughterhood and motherhood overlap? Argentine actress and author Romina Paula directs and stars in this deliciously easy-going, autobiographical treatise on the uncertainties of life at 40. Existential feminism, rendered with disarming honesty, intelligence and charm.

ONCE THERE WAS BRASILIA

Adirley Queirós Brazil, 2017

Defined by its director as a work of “futurist ethnography,” this gem of Brazilian underground cinema is a dystopian sci-fi at once witty and visually thrilling. Powerfully commenting on modern-day racism, Adirley Queirós’ third film digs into the very heart of both past and present politics.

FRAGILE AS THE WORLD

Rita Azevedo Gomes Portugal, 2002

Next in our focus on Rita Azevedo Gomes is the Portuguese filmmaker’s serene sophomore feature: a strikingly stylized, fable-like story of impossible young love. Impeccably crafted, Fragile as the World is both rigorous and delicate, oscillating poetically between black and white and color.

OFFICE

Johnnie To China, 2015

Johnnie To’s glimmering, genre-bending masterpiece is a collaboration with the great Sylvia Chang, who co-stars and adapted her stage musical. A wicked intertwining of romance and capitalism, it features Chow Yun-fat and gorgeously artificial production design by Wong Kar-wai favorite William Chang.

VIVA RIVA!

Djo Tunda Wa Munga Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2010

This slick Congolese thriller from emerging director Djo Munga (State of Mind) takes us through the crime-ridden backstreets of DR Congo’s capital with electrifying pacing and a deliciously noir-soaked nihilism. Expect plenty of sex, violence, and some tightly wound performances: Viva Riva indeed!

HAPPY PEOPLE: A YEAR IN THE TAIGA

Werner Herzog, Dmitry Vasyukov Germany, 2010

A rugged journey to the Siberian taiga, this absorbing documentary is a remarkable entry into Werner Herzog’s global explorations. Assembled by master editor Joe Bini and combined with Herzog’s marveling narration, Dmitry Vasyukov’s astonishing footage takes on a second life as ecstatic cinema.

FAKE IT SO REAL

Robert Greene United States, 2011

Closing our series on cinematographer Sean Price Williams is Robert Greene’s (Bisbee ’17) empathetic portrait of amateur wrestling. Capturing the paradoxical tenderness of the sport, the film subtly focuses on the mythmaking of wrestling and the escape it offers from the struggles of Southern life.

JOBE'Z WORLD

Michael M. Bilandic United States, 2018

Michael M. Bilandic’s chaotic comedy is a perfect descent into a bygone era of NYC weirdos. Set to Paul Grimstad’s lo-fi score, Sean Price Williams’ hazy images illuminate sublime performances from Jason Grisell and Theodore Bouloukos in this insomniac thrill ride.

LANDLESS

Camila Freitas Brazil, 2019

This visually striking film follows a group of agricultural activists fighting for protection of the land and dreaming up utopian solutions. Camila Freitas’s captivating study of land rights and the resilience of hope feels energetically supercharged by Brazil’s perilous politics of today.

THE PORTUGUESE WOMAN

Rita Azevedo Gomes Portugal, 2018

We’re thrilled to open our focus on Portuguese luminary Rita Azevedo Gomes and her sublime cinema of artifice with one of her latest marvels. This 16th century tale of a woman’s torpor, based on a Robert Musil novella, comes to life through theatrical splendour and striking, painterly compositions.

LA FLOR (PART 3)

Mariano Llinás Argentina, 2018

Upending the predictability of episodic structure, La Flor reinvents itself with formal and thematic shifts. Part 3 contains a metafiction, a remake of Jean Renoir’s A Day in the Country, and a period piece, but make sure to stick around for the unmissable 38-minute long end credit sequence.

LA FLOR (PART 2)

Mariano Llinás Argentina, 2018

Moving through genres and filmmaking modes, one constant remains throughout La Flor: Elisa Carricajo, Valeria Correa, Pilar Gamboa, and Laura Paredes, the four remarkable actors at the heart of the film. Entertaining throughout, the second part is composed of one episode, a winding spy thriller.

LA FLOR (PART 1)

Mariano Llinás Argentina, 2018

Ten years in the making, this sublimely playful Argentinian epic is split in three parts of six episodes that each tell different stories with different genres—but the same actresses!—and introduced by director Mariano Llinás himself. A madly entertaining journey worth every minute of its runtime.

STAY AS YOU ARE

Alberto Lattuada Italy, 1978

A much-missed Ennio Morricone composed the score to this steamy Spanish-Italian sex film, starring a world-weary Marcello Mastrioanni and a young Nastassja Kinski at the height of her charms. A cult erotic drama about incest, age gaps, and absent father figures that’s very much of its time!

VILLA EMPAIN

Katharina Kastner Belgium, 2019

Some places are haunted not by ghosts, but by history. Katharina Kastner has found one: Baron Empain’s extraordinary 1934 mansion, a marvel of period design that has seen ruin and revival. With the elegance of Resnais and Raúl Ruiz, this beguiling poem of a film conjures the magic of its existence.

GOOD MANNERS

Marco Dutra, Juliana Rojas Brazil, 2017

Springing from an urban legend, this ferociously inventive Brazilian “creature feature” combines sharp social observation and lesbian desire with unsettling fantasy elements. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Locarno, Good Manners is a visually exciting and boundary-pushing gem of genre cinema.

JUNUN

Paul Thomas Anderson United States, 2015

Featuring Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood, Israeli musician Shye Ben Tzur, and amazing Indian artists, Paul Thomas Anderson’s one-of-a-kind documentary is an intimate, eclectic, multi-cultural, multi-musical journey. Prepare to be uplifted.

I AM SOMEBODY

Madeline Anderson United States, 1969

A perfect document of the intersections between race, class, and gender, I Am Somebody is Madeline’s Anderson’s exemplary film. Featuring Coretta Scott King amongst Black female hospital workers in their labor struggle, Anderson’s kinship with her subjects is felt in every frame.

TRIBUTE TO MALCOLM X

Madeline Anderson United States, 1967

Commissioned by William Greaves’ television program Black Journal, this film from pioneering director Madeline Anderson is a eulogy to Malcolm X. Featuring a rare interview with his widow, Betty Shabazz, the film combines archival footage and images of his funeral to form an essential portrait.

INTEGRATION REPORT 1

Madeline Anderson United States, 1960

Starting our Madeline Anderson series is her essential debut film, a vital snapshot of the civil rights movement. Capturing the bubbling energy of the late 50s by tracking various forms of activism, the film is a great historical record and one of the pioneering political films of Direct Cinema.

FILM TITLE POEM

Jennifer West (XIII) United States, 2016

In this playful, poetic collage of memorable title cards, Jennifer West effortlessly weaves between formats, techniques, and typography to evoke a “psychic montage” of her cinephilic inner life. Vibrant and dream-like, Film Title Poem testifies to the potent sway that the movies can have on us.

GUMNAAM

Raja Nawathe India, 1965

This classic mid-60s Indian suspense thriller is a hugely enjoyable adaptation of Agatha Christie’s mystery novel And Then There Were None. A musical murder mystery with a totally legendary soundtrack: The cult dance number “Jaan Pehechan Ho” famously appears in Ghost World!

BREAKWATER

Cris Lyra Brazil, 2019

In this collectively made short, Cris Lyra’s intimate gaze records, with minute attention, the bodies and voices of a group of friends as they talk about sexual identity and politics in today’s Brazil. This is affective lesbian cinema, in the vein of Barbara Hammer, where caring and community reign.