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16 days to watch

The Glass Note

Directed by Mary Helena Clark
United States, 2018
Avant-Garde, Short
  • English
  • No subtitles
New York Film Festival's Projections

Synopsis

In The Glass Note, a collage of sound, image, and text explore cinema’s inherent ventriloquism. Across surface and form, the video reflects on voice, embodiment, and fetish through the commingling of sound and image.

Our take

Continuing our series of bold short films straight from their NYFF premiere is artist Mary Helena Clark’s surprising and gratifyingly unorthodox work that seeks disparate connections between voices, noises, and bodies from unexpected sources, provoking our sense of sound and image’s relationship.

The Glass Note Directed by Mary Helena Clark Watch now
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What are people saying?

  • Miels Clifton's rating of the film The Glass Note

    It seems like an appreciation of sound, but of a private kind. As the waves cover the ears they tend to sting, but the sting is precise and connected. I feel the sound moving between the images and it becomes trapped in my mind.It is an unsettling amalgamation pierced with cacophony and reason. I don't mind it at all.

  • cesar villanueva's rating of the film The Glass Note

    Mesmerizing and unique. Seems like everyone and their mother is taking a shot at ASMR these days. But while scuffling through the tens of thousands, you find The Glass Note. It does more than just experiment with sound, it has great composition and imagery that does more than trigger a sensory response from the audience. Would recommend if you have a headset and an extra 10 minutes to spare.

  • Harrison Ryan's rating of the film The Glass Note

    While an interesting formalist film, one that focuses primarily on sound rather than traditional aspects such as screenplay, the film lacks a cohesive structure and therefore at times loses its ability to retain my attention. The cinematography and sound is beautiful to listen to, and the short duration of the film prevents it from over doing-itself and it retains a unique identity without getting old and repetitive.

  • Austin Burnett's rating of the film The Glass Note

    Sound is arguably the most important technical element at play here. The director's manipulation of a variety of auditory components is uniquely engaging for the viewer. As is the case with most modern shorts, this film is undoubtedly very formalist in nature, focusing on technique and the various elements of cinematography, sound, and editing in the absence of any apparent narrative. This is well done.

  • easypz's rating of the film The Glass Note

    Like many experimental films, I find this overly conceptual. Benefit of the doubt: maybe the artist did originally intuit a connection between things. But their process doesn't sell it. It feels like the analytical brain was put in charge of expressing a poetic truth. It does stitch together concepts through picture/sound editing & text, yet I don't feel an intimacy, a conviction that the links are authentic.

  • Loz Loory's rating of the film The Glass Note

    Necks are bizarre tubes to watch when the body parts they connect with aren't shown. I could have watched a bunch of necks and been happy. That high B flat (?) tone was hard on the ears. Wish the throne had been more impressively throne-like, or the lions had more articulated faces around their open mouths. Wish I knew better what sort of criteria to use in evaluating these short, avant-garde films.

  • Trevor Key's rating of the film The Glass Note

    Go ahead and turn your headphone volume down before you start this film. However, not to much because of course sound is a massive part of this film. This film pushes the boundaries of human's abilities to relate audio and video stimuli. There are certain scenes in this film that play a distorted audio clip for such a long period of time that the audience begins to question what the sound is.

  • Daniel Lubitsky's rating of the film The Glass Note

    A seemingly in-cohesive but pretty short art film. The substance is certainly found in some beautiful and well framed shots sprinkled throughout. Many of theses are accompanied by some very pretty audio. It is certainly worth the watch since it is a short film, but do not expect to much out of it.

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