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Yes, it’s that time of the year where everything becomes pink. This Valentine’s, we’ve decided to take the bull by the horns and dig deeper into the cinematic genre that has unashamedly embraced the daunting possibilities of love with both lightness and insight. We are very excited to present a season of seven films exploring the tropes of romantic comedies, an unexpectedly malleable universe that allows for an extraordinary diversity of approaches and tones. From the enchanting grace of screwball, to the melancholy of Albert Brooks’ dry humour, to the charm of Korean eccentricity, two things seem irrefutable: all we need is love and laughs.

Modern Romance

Albert Brooks United States, 1981

Today we close out our program of rom com variations with this Albert Brooks comedy regarding a breakup. Depictions of separations are often all too brief in the genre, but not here–the investigation of breakups as a site of great pain, sadness, and humour is realized in brilliant comedic form.

Yossi

Eytan Fox Israel, 2012

Eytan Fox picks up the story of his hit Yossi & Jagger by focusing on how one partner, left alone, rebuilds a life—romantic and otherwise. As with his earlier film, the insight into Israeli gay culture is special, as is the sensitive handling of someone romantically withdrawn opening up.

My Girlfriend's Boyfriend

Éric Rohmer France, 1987

New Wave master Éric Rohmer’s interest in the intricacies of romance has never been a secret. Part of his beloved Comedies and Proverbs series, this playfully capricious four-sided love entanglement channels the volatile nature of human feelings with effortless irony. What a slippery thing love is!

Petty Romance

Kim Jeong-Hoon-Il South Korea, 2010

You’re kidding yourself if you think only the English and Americans makes fools of themselves over romance (and romantic comedies). Today’s South Korean cinema thrives on the genre (and such lovey tomfoolery). Petty Romance finds an unlucky pair unexpectedly working towards love by working together.

The Awful Truth

Leo McCarey United States, 1937

Stanley Cavell calls films like this masterpiece a comedy of remarriage, a new story forged at the height of the screwballs where a couple falls apart and we watch (with delight) as they flirt, fight and fall in love all over again. Cary Grant and Irene Dunne here are a sparkling match for the ages.

The King of Escape

Alain Guiraudie France, 2009

Stranger by the Lake director Guiraudie’s deceptively casual anti-road movie pairs a middle-aged gay man with a horny teenage girl. We can’t quite say opposites attract, but, rather, things get complicated and strange—and all with Guiraudie’s quiet surrealism, unabashed sexuality and compassion.

Shampoo

Hal Ashby United States, 1975

Today we launch our program dedicated to the art of the romantic comedy with an inspired classic from Hal Ashby. The young and beautiful Warren Beatty & Goldie Hawn star in this hilarious sex farce regarding a promiscuous bachelor. Also co-stars the late Carrie Fisher in her first screen role!

Life is too short for bad films

Every day we hand-pick a beautiful new film and you have a whole month to watch it, so there’s always 30 perfectly curated films to discover.