For a better experience on MUBI, update your browser.

"Adieu au langage" - "Goodbye to Language": A Works Cited

An in-progress catalog and translation of the various texts, films and music used in Jean-Luc Godard's "Adieu au langage".

Adieu au langage - Goodbye to Language

A Works Cited

Introduction

From its bluntly political opening (Alfredo Bandelli's 'La caccia alle streghe': "Always united we win, long live the revolution!") to its pessimistic fecal humor and word play—with 3D staging that happily puts to shame James Cameron and every other hack who's tried their hand at it these past several years—Adieu au langage overwhelms us with a deluge of recited texts, music and images, hardly ever bothering to slow down to let us catch our breath. Exhilarating and certainly not surprising—this is the guy who made Puissance de la parole after all!

The release of a new Godard film or video means a new encounter with texts, films and music often familiar from the filmmaker's earlier work—reworked and re-contextualized—as well as new discoveries to be sorted through and identified. This life-long interest in quotation often inspires much research around Godard's work, such as Céline Scemama's amazing, second by second breakdown of Histoire(s) du cinéma or Adrian Martin's 'Recital: Three Lyrical Interludes in Godard' in For Ever Godard.

Last year I translated twenty-some of Godard's videos for a retrospective at Film Society of the Lincoln Center and in the course of transcribing and translating, I became very familiar with Godard's references. So after the first screening of Adieu au langage I attended and with much help from Google, I began working on identifying the works cited in the film.

Knowing the original sources of Godard's work often seems to me to be about as useful to "unlocking" the films and videos as reading a heavily footnoted copy of The Waste Land. Which is to say that I don't think the following will provide answers—and if it did, what would the questions even be?—but hopefully will allow for a deeper appreciation of what Godard does when he takes a text, excerpts a few lines—perhaps slightly or significantly altering them—and puts them in a montage with other texts or film clips or music.

This works cited is far from complete. Many gaps are waiting to be filled in. I've identified many more works than those that are cited in the end credits, and failed to identify several by authors cited in those credits. Some of these quotations might be apocryphal or wrongly attributed. For example, Godard quotes Proust but attributes it to Claude Monet. He cites William Faulkner ("Not our feelings or our lived experiences but the silent tenacity we affront them with") but I have been unable to locate where Faulkner made such a statement. Perhaps he did but Godard has modified and reworked the lines so much that they no longer bear any relation to the original. Perhaps Godard is simply attributing his own thoughts to other authors.

The works cited is organized alphabetically by author's last names and is in two sections—first texts and films, then music. Each quote is presented as it appears in the film and as it appeared originally and each quote is presented in French and English. Often, when the film's subtitles provided only a partial translation, I added the untranslated sections in italics.

Many thanks go to Viktor Kirtov at Pile Face and Jean-Luc Lacuve at Cine-Club de Caen for their work going through the film and identifying many sources after the film's Paris release, giving me an excellent basis from which to begin; Vadim Rizov and Dan Sullivan; R. Emmet Sweeney and Kino Lorber; Sílvia das Fadas and Sam Engel.

***

Aja, Alexander, Piranha 3D (2010)

A brief image from the film - a woman having her hair pulled by the motor of a motorboat, her face splashing out of the water and being tugged back in, in slow motion - appears in the film.

Alain, Sentiments, passions et signes (Feelings, Passions and Signs)

Film:
Je voudrais appeler prolétaire, le roi des choses.

(I would like to call proletarian the king of things.)

Original:
Je voudrais appeler prolétaire le roi des choses, et bourgeois le roi des signes.

(I would like to call proletarian the king of things, and bourgeois the king of signs.)

Anouilh, Jean, Antigone

Film:
Vous me dégoûtez tous avec votre bonheur. La vie qu’il faut aimer coûte que coûte. Moi je suis là pour autre chose. Je suis là pour vous dire non et pour mourir. Pour vous dire non et pour mourir.

(You all disgust me with your happiness. Life that must be loved at all costs. I am here for something else. I am here to tell you no and to die. To tell you no and to die.)

Original:
Vous me dégoûtez tous avec votre bonheur ! Avec votre vie qu'il faut aimer coûte que coûte. […] Je ne veux pas comprendre. Moi, je suis là pour autre chose que pour comprendre. Je suis là pour vous dire non et pour mourir.

(You all disgust me with your happiness! With your life that must be loved at all costs. […] I do not want to understand. I am here for something other than understanding. I am here to tell you no and to die.)

Apollinaire, Guillaume, Alcools

Film:
Cette histoire n’a rien de tragique. Ni le rire des géants, aucun détail indifférent ne dit leur amour pathétique.

(Nothing tragic about this story. Not the laughter of giants, no indifferent detail recounts their pathetic love.)

Original:
Notre histoire est noble et tragique
Comme le masque d’un tyran
Nul drame hasardeux ou magique
Aucun détail indifférent
Ne rend notre amour pathétique

(Our story is noble and tragic
Like a tyrant's mask
No hasardous or magic drama
No indifferent detail
Makes our love pathetic)

Aragon, Louis, Elsa, je t'aime

Film:
Evite, et vite, les souvenirs brisés.
(Avoid, and quickly, broken memories.)

Original:
Au biseau des baisers
Les ans passent trop vite
Evite évite évite
Les souvenirs brisés

(On the kiss's beveled edge,
The years pass too quickly,
Avoid avoid avoid
Broken memories.

*The full verse is quoted on the soundtrack by Godard in A bout de souffle.

Aristakisyan, Artur,  Ladoni (Palms, 1994)

Images from the film appear early in the film.

Badiou, Alain, Le réveil de l'histoire (The Rebirth of History)

Film:
Que se passe-t-il ? Continuation vaille que vaille d’un monde fatigué ? Fin de ce monde ? Avènement d’un autre monde ? Que nous arrive-t-il donc, à l’orée du siècle, qui ne semble n’avoir aucun nom clair dans aucune langue tolérée ?

(What is going on? The continuation, at all costs, of a weary world? The end of that world? The advent of a different world? What is happening to us in the early years of the century, something that would appear not to have any clear name in any accepted language.)

Original:
Que se passe-t-il ? De quoi sommes-nous les témoins, mi-fascinés, mi-dévastés ? Continuation vaille que vaille d’un monde fatigué ? Crise bénéfique du même monde, en proie à son victorieux élargissement ? Fin de ce monde ? Avènement d’un autre monde ? Que nous arrive-t-il donc, à l’orée du siècle, qui ne semble avoir aucun nom clair dans aucune langue tolérée?

(What is going on? Of what are we the half-fascinated, half-devastated witnesses? The continuation, at all costs, of a weary world? A salutary crisis of that world, racked by its victorious expansion? The end of that world? The advent of a different world? What is happening to us in the early years of the century — something that would appear not to have any clear name in any accepted language?) Translation by Gregory Elliott

Barnet, Boris, By the Bluest of Seas

Seen on the living room TV.

Beckett, Samuel, L'image (The Image)

Film:
…plus soif la langue rentre la bouche se referme elle doit faire une ligne à présent c’est fait j’ai fait l’image.

(…not thirsty anymore the tongue goes back into the mouth it closes it has to make a straight line now it's done I've made the image.)

Same as original

Benoist, Joceyln, Concepts, introduction à l'analyse

Film:
Monsieur, est-ce qu'il est possible de produire un concept d'Afrique ?

(Sir, is it possible to produce a concept about Africa?)

Blanchot, Maurice, L'attente oubli (Awaiting Oblivion)

1.

Film:
Faites en sorte que je puisse vous parler.

(Make it so I can speak to you.)

Persuadez-moi que vous m'entendez.

(Persuade me that you hear me.)

Same as original.

2.

Film:
Je cherche la pauvreté dans le langage.

(I am looking for poverty in language.)

Original:
Ils cherchaient l'un et l'autre la pauvreté dans le langage.

(They were both looking for poverty in language.)

Borges, Jorge Luis, Le Livre du sable (The Book of Sand)

Film:
“Cette matinée est un rêve, chacun doit penser que le rêveur c'est l'autre”

(This morning is a dream, each one must think that the dreamer is the other one.)

Original:
“Si cette matinée et cette rencontre sont des rêves, chacun de nous deux doit penser que le rêveur c’est lui.”

(If this morning and this encounter are dreams, each of us must think that they are the dreamer.)

Céline, Louis-Ferdinand, L'église (The Church), La lettre à Elie Faure (Letter to Elie Faure)

L'église

Also used as an epigraph by Jean-Paul Sartre to Nausea.

Film:
C'est juste un individu.

(He's just an individual.)

Original:
C'est un garçon sans importance collective, c'est juste un individu.

(He is a boy without collective importance, he's just an individual.)

La lettre à Elie Faure (Badgastein, Jully 22 or 23, 1935)

Film:
Céline disait : «Le difficile c’est de faire rentrer le plat dans la profondeur».

(Céline said: "What's difficult is to fit flatness into depth.")

Original:
L’abstrait c’est facile. C’est le refuge de tous les fainéants. Qui ne travaille pas est pourvu d’idées générales et généreuses. Ce qui est beaucoup plus difficile, c’est de faire rentrer l’abstrait dans le concret. 

(The abstract is easy. It's the refuge of every lazy person. Those who don't work are deprived of general and generous ideas. What is much more difficult is to fit the abstract into the concret.)

Chardonne, Jacques, Eva ou le journal interrompu (Eva or the Interrupted Journal)

Film:
Une femme ne peut pas faire de mal… Elle peut vous gêner, elle peut vous tuer, c’est tout.

(A woman can do no harm... She can annoy you, she can kill you, no more.)

Original:
Une femme ne peut pas beaucoup nuire à un grand homme. Il porte en lui-même toute sa tragédie. Elle peut le gêner, l’agacer. Elle peut le tuer. C’est tout. 

(A woman can not do much harm to a great man. He carries his whole tragedy within him. She can annoy him, bother him. She can kill him. No more.)

Cocteau, Jean, Le testament d'Orphée (Testament of Orpheus)

Film:
Vous êtes au lit, professeur. Vous dormez. Seulement, vous ne nous rêvez pas.

(You are in bed, professor. You are sleeping. Only, you are not dreaming of us.)

Same as original (excerpted from film)

Clastres, Pierre, La Société contre l'état (Society Against the State)

Book being held by one of the characters early in the film.

Curnier, Jean-Paul, Un monde en guerre (A World at War)

Published in Lignes, citing Claude Lefort

Film:
Et démocraties modernes qui feront de la politique un domaine de pensée séparé ont predisposé à totalitarisme.

(And modern democracies that make politics a separate domain of thought are predisposed to totalitarianism.) 

Original:
En faisant de la politique un domaine de pensée séparé, les démocraties modernes prédisposent au totalitarisme.

(By making politics a separate domain of thought, modern democracies are predisposed to totalitariansim.)

Darrieusecq, Marie, La résonance d'une phrase

Film:
Tous ceux qui manquent d'imagination se réfugient dans la réalité.
(Those lacking in imagination take refuge in reality.)

Original:
In this article from Le Monde, published several months before the film's premiere, Darrieusecq traces the expression back through a variety of sources. It is possible Godard - who is a fan of Darrieusecq's fiction - read the article.

Darwin, Charles, The Descent of Man

Darwin is quoting Josh Billings, quoted by Dr. Lauder Lindsay.

Film:
"Et Darwin, citant Buffon, affirme que le chien est le seul être sur terre qui ne vous aime plus qu'il ne s'aime lui-même."

(And Darwin, quoting Buffon, affirms that the dog is the only living creature on earth that loves you more than it loves itself.)

Original:
The love of a dog for his master is notorious; as an old writer quaintly says (9. Quoted by Dr. Lauder Lindsay, in his 'Physiology of Mind in the Lower Animals,' 'Journal of Mental Science,' April 1871, p. 38.), "A dog is the only thing on this earth that luvs you more than he luvs himself."

Derrida, Jacques, L'animal que donc je suis (The Animal that Therefore I Am)

Film:
Il n’y a pas de nudité dans la nature. Et l’animal, donc, n’est pas nu parce qu’il est nu.

(There is no nudity in nature. And the animal, therefore, is not nude because he is nude.)

Original:
L’animal, donc n’est pas nu parce qu’il est nu. Il n’a pas le sentiment de sa nudité. Il n’y a pas de nudité dans la nature.

(The animal, therefore, is not nude because he is nude. He does not have the feeling of his nudity. There is no nudity in nature.)

Dolto, Françoise, L'évangile au risque de la psychanalyse (The Gospel at the Risk of Psychoanalysis)

Film:
L'ombre de Dieu. Ne l'est-elle pas pour une femme qui aime son homme ?

(The shadow of God. Is it not for a woman who loves her man?)

Original:
L'ombre de Dieu, tout homme ne l'est-il pas pour une femme qui aime son homme?

(Is not every man God's shadow for the woman who loves him?)

Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, The Possessed

Seen on the table of books at the beginning of the film. Quoted twice.

1.
Film:
Tout le monde peut faire qu'il n'y a pas de Dieu mais personne ne le fait.

(Everyone can stop God from existing but no one does.)

Original (from French translation):
Aujourd'hui chacun peut faire qu'il n'y ait pas de Dieu et qu'il n'y ait rien. Mais personne ne l'a jamais encore fait.

(Now every one can make it so that there is no God and that there is nothing. But no one has done it yet.)

2.
Film:
- C’est ce que disait Kiriloff : «Deux questions : une grande et une petite. Mais la petite est grande aussi».
- C’est quoi la petite ?
- La souffrance.
- Et la grande ?
- L’autre monde. L’autre monde.
(- It's what Kiriloff said: "Two questions, a big one and a small one. But the small one is big."
- What is the small one?
- Suffering.
- And the big one?
- The other world. The other world.)

Original (from French translation):

- Je… je ne le sais pas encore bien… deux préjugés les arrêtent, deux choses ; il n’y en a que deux, l’une est fort insignifiante, l’autre très sérieuse. Mais la première ne laisse pas elle-même d’avoir beaucoup d’importance.
- Quelle est-elle ?
- La souffrance.
- La souffrance ? Est-il possible qu’elle joue un si grand rôle… dans ce cas ?
- Le plus grand. Il faut distinguer : il y a des gens qui se tuent sous l’influence d’un grand chagrin, ou par colère ou parce qu’ils sont fous, ou parce que tout leur est égal. Ceux-là se donnent la mort brusquement et ne pensent guère à la souffrance. Mais ceux qui se suicident par raison y pensent beaucoup. […]
- Eh bien, et la seconde cause, celle que vous avez déclarée sérieuse ?
- C’est l’autre monde.
- C’est-à-dire la punition ?
- Cela, ce n’est rien. L’autre monde tout simplement.

(- I... I don't yet know... two prejudices stop them, two thing; there are only two of them, one is very insignificant, the other very serious. But the first is not very important in itself.
- What is it?
- Suffering.
- Suffering? Is it possible that it plays such a big role... in this case?
- The biggest. A distinction must be made: there are people who kill themselves under the influence of a great sorrow, or out of anger or because they are made, or because nothing matters to them. Those ones kill themselves suddenly and hardly think of suffering. But those who commit suicide out of reason think too much. [...]
- Well, and the second cause, the one you declared as serious?
- It's the other world.
- That is to say, punishment?
- That is nothing. The other world, simply.)

Ellul, Jacques
, Victoire d'Hitler?

Originally published in Réforme, June 23, 1945. Reprinted in Maurice Daumon's Jean-Luc Godard et la question juive (Jean-Luc Godard and the Jewish Question, 2011).

1.
Film:
Tout ce qu'Hitler avait dit, il l'a fait. Ce n'est pas la première fois que le vaincu par les armes arrive à vaincre politiquement son vainqueur. Par exemple, les armées de la Révolution et de l'Empire furent en définitive vaincues, mais elles avaient porté dans toute l'Europe l'idée de République.

(Everything Hitler said, he accomplished. This is not the first time someone conquered by arms manages to conquer his conqueror politically. For example, armies of the Revolution and the Empire were definitively conquered. But they carried throughout Europe the idea of a Republic.)

Original:
Tout ce qu'il avait dit, il l'a fait. […]  Et ce ne serait pas la première fois que le vaincu par les armes arrive à vaincre politiquement son vainqueur. Ainsi les armées de la Révolution et de l'Empire furent en définitive vaincues, mais elles avaient porté dans toute l'Europe l'idée de République et le sentiment de la liberté dont personne ne pût arrêter la marche triomphale au XIXe siècle.

(Everything he said, he accomplished. [...] And it wouldn't be the first time that someone conquered by arms manages to conquer his conqueror politically. Thus, the armies of the Revolution and the Empire were definitively conquered, but they carried throughout Europe the idea of a Republic and the feeling of freedom whose triumphal march into the 19th century no one has been able to stop.)

2.
Film:
La mobilisation totale a pour conséquence que les forces accomplissent une tâche pour laquelle elles ne sont pas faites. Et surtout, le fait que l'Etat est couronné de la toute puissance absolue.

(Total mobilization has as a consequence that forces accomplish a task for which they are not made. And especially the fact that the State is given absolute power."

Original:
D'autre part, la mobilisation totale a eu des conséquences parallèles. Non seulement le fait que les forces mobilisées accomplissent une tâche pour laquelle elle ne sont pas faîtes, mais surtout, le fait que l'Etat est couronné de la toute puissance absolue.

(In addition, total mobilization has had parallel consequences. Not only the fact that mobilized forces accomplish a task for which they are not made but, especially, the fact that the State is given absolute power.)

3.
Film:
Il doit placer à la tête de tout des techniciens qui deviennent les premiers dans la nation. L'Etat prend tout. Et tout ce qu'il conquiert comme pouvoir, il ne l'aura jamais. C'est là, la deuxième victoire d'Hitler.

(It must place at the head of everything, technicians who become leaders of the nation. The State takes everything. And everything that it conquers as a power, it will never have. That is Hitler's second victory.)

Original:
…et placer à la tête de tout des techniciens qui deviennent les premiers dans la nation. […] L'Etat prend tout… […] tout ce que l'Etat conquiert comme pouvoir, il ne le perd jamais. Et c'est là la seconde victoire d'Hitler."

(...and place at the head of everything technicians who become leaders of the nation. [...] The State takes everything... [...] everything that the State conquers as a power, it never loses. And that's Hitler's second victory.)

4.
Film:
On a pris l'habitude que l'Etat fasse tout, et sitôt que quelque chose va mal, on rend l'Etat responsable. On lui demande de prendre la vie de la nation toute entière a sa charge. [...] Si l'on songe que réagir suppose que l'on réagit contre l'économie dirigée, contre la police, contre l'assistance sociale, on voit que l'on dresse la totalité de la nation contre soi. En fait, Hitler n'a rien inventé. Il y a une longue tradition qui a préparée cette crise : Machiaveilli, Richelieu, Bismarck.

(We've become used to the State doing everything and as soon as something goes wrong, we make the State responsible. We ask it to take the nation's life entirely in its charge. [...] If we think that reacting supposes that we react against a directed economy, against the police, against social assistance, we see that we're raising the totality of the nation against us. In fact, Hitler did not invent anything. There is a long tradition that prepared this crisis: Machiavelli, Richelieu, Bismarck.)

Original:
On a pris l'habitude que l'Etat fasse tout, et sitôt que quelque chose va mal, on en rend l'Etat  responsable. Qu'est ce à dire sinon que l'on demande à l'Etat de prendre la vie de la nation toute entière à charge ? [...] Or si l'on songe que réagir supposerait que l'on réagît contre l'envahissement de l'Etat, contre l'économie dirigée, contre la police, contre l'assistance sociale, on voit que l'on dresserait la totalité de la nation contre soi, car on réagit contre des choses admises et jugées bonnes, des choses dont personne aujourd'hui ne peut dire comment on pourrait s'en passer ! [...] L'agent seulement car il n'a rien inventé. Il y a une longue tradition qui a préparé cette crise et les noms de Machiavel, de Richelieu, de Bismarck, viennent aux lèvres, et l'exemple d'Etats qui depuis 1918 vivent déjà cette dictature et ce totalitarisme saute aux yeux.

(We've become used to the State doing everything and as soon as something goes wrong, we make the State responsible. What does it mean if not that we're asking the State to take the nation's life entirely in its charge? [...] Now, if we think that reacting supposes that we react against the invasion of the State, against a directed economy, against the police, against social assistance, we see that we're raising the totality of the nation against us because we're reacting against things that are admitted and judged as good, things which no one today can say how we'd do without them! [...] Just the agent because he did not invent anything. There is a long tradition that prepared this crisis and the names of Machiavelli, Richelieu and Bismarck come to mind as well as the example of States that, since 1918, have already experienced this dictatorship and totalitarianism.)

Full text

Franck, Didier, Nietzsche et l'ombre de Dieu (Nietzsche and the Shadow of God)

Film:
L'ombre de Dieu!

(The shadow of God!)

Freud, Sigmund, Vorlesungen zur Einführung in die Psychoanalyse (Introduction to Psychoanalysis)

Film:
Dans les mythes relatifs à la naissance des héros, que Rank avait soumis à une analyse comparée, l'immersion dans l'eau et le sauvetage de l'eau jouent un rôle analogue aux représentations de la naissance qui se manifeste dans le rêve.

(In myths recounting the birth of the hero, that Rank submitted to comparative examination, being submerged in water and rescued from water is similar to representations of birth manifest in dreams.)

Original:
Dans les mythes relatifs à la naissance de héros, que O. Rank avait soumis à une analyse comparée […] l’immersion dans l’eau et le sauvetage de l’eau jouent un rôle prédominant. Rank a trouvé qu’il s’agit là de représentations symboliques de la naissance, analogues à celles qui se manifestent dans le rêve.

(In myths recounting the birth of the hero, that O. Rank submitted to comparative examination […] being submerged in water and rescued from water play a predominating role. Rank found that these are symbolic representations of birth, analogous to those manifest in dreams.)

Godard, Jean-Luc, Une Vie

Review of Alexandre Astruc's film Une Vie, from issue 89 of Cahiers du cinéma, published in English in Godard on Godard, translated by Tom Milne

Film:
Montrer une fôret: facile. Mais montrer une chambre dont on sait que la fôret est à dix pas: difficile.

(Showing a forest, easy. But showing a room with a forest nearby, difficult.)

Original:
Car ce n'est pas de montrer la fôret qui était difficile, c'est de montrer un salon dont on sait que la fôret est à dix pas.

(The difficulty is not in showing the forest, but in showing a room where one knows that the forest is a few paces away.) Translation by Tom Milne.

Green, Julien, Journal

Film:
- Il n’a pas pu faire de nous… Il n’a n’as pas pu faire de nous des humbles.
- Qui ça ?
- Ou pas su ou pas voulu. Alors il a fait de nous des humiliés.
- Qui ça ?
- Dieu.
(- He could not make us... He could not make us humble.
- Who?
- Or could not. Or would not. So he made us humiliated.
- Who?
- God.)

Original:
Dieu n’ayant pu faire de nous des humbles fait de nous des humiliés !
(God, unable to make us humble, made us humiliated!)

Flaubert, Gustave, L'Éducation sentimentale (Sentimental Education)

Film:
Oui, c'est ce que nous avons eu de meilleur, dit Deslauriers.

(Yes, it was the best time we ever had, said Deslauriers.)

Original:
C'est là ce que nous avons eu de meilleur !, dit Deslauriers.

("It was the best time we ever had!" said Deslauriers.)

France-Lanord, Hadrien, Heidegger: une pensée irréductible à ses erreurs (Heidegger: Thought Irreducible to its Errors)

Published in Le Monde, January 28, 2014

Film:
Reste à savoir si de la non-pensée contamine la pensée.

(It remains to be seen if non-thought contaminates thought.)

Original:
Reste à savoir si une non-pensée contamine une pensée.

(It remains to be seen if a non-thought contaminates thought.)

Hawks, Howard, Only Angels Have Wings

Excerpt at the beginning of the film.

Hugo, Victor, L'Expiation (Expiation)

Poem in Les châtiments (Punishments)

Film: Dans ton cirque de bois, de côteaux, de vallons, la pâle mort, mêlée à des sombres bataillons."

(In your circus of woods, hillocks, valleys, pale death swirled together the sombre battalions.)

Same as original.

Saint Just, Rapport à la convention, March 3, 1794

Film:
Vous pourriez aussi dire comme en Europe que le bonheur n’est pas une idée neuve?

(Could you also say, as in Europe, that happiness is not a new idea?)

Original:
Le bonheur est une idée neuve en Europe.

(Happiness is a new idea in Europe.)

King, Henry, The Snows of Kilimanjaro

Playing on the living room TV.

Lang, Fritz, Metropolis 

Playing on the living room TV.

Lévinas, Emmanuel, Totalité et infini (Totality and Infinity)

Film:
Seuls les êtres libres peuvent être étrangers les uns aux autres. Ils ont une liberté commune, mais précisément cela les sépare.

(Only free beings can be strangers to each other. They have a shared freedom but that is precisely what separates them.)

Original:
Seuls les êtres libres peuvent être étrangers les uns aux autres. La liberté qui leur est « commune » est précisément ce qui les sépare.

(Only free beings can be strangers to each other. Their freedom which is "common" to them is precisely what separates them.)

Mamoulian, Rouben, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Playing on living room TV.

Melville, Jean-Pierre
, Les Enfants terribles (The Terrible Children, 1950)

A clip from the film, of Nicole Stéphane appears one time. Also included in Vrai/Faux passeport.

Pavese, Cesar, La casa in collina (The House on the Hill)

Film:
Maintenant que j'ai vu ce qu'était la guerre, je sais que si elle finissait, tout le monde devrait se demander: qu'allons nous faire des morts? Mais il n'y a peut-être que pour eux que la guerre est finie.

(Now that I have seen what war was, I know that if it ended, everyone would ask themselves: what do we do with the bodies? Perhaps only for them is the war over.)

Original
Maintenant que j'ai vu ce qu'était la guerre, la guerre civile, je savais que si elle finissait, tout le monde devrait se demander : "Qu'allons-nous faire de ceux qui sont tombés ? Pourquoi sont-ils morts ?" […] Il n'y a peut-être que les morts à savoir, et il n'y a qu'eux pour qui la guerre soit finie pour de bon.

(Now that I have seen what war was, civil war, I know that if it ended, everyone would ask themselves: "what do we do with those who have fallen? Why are they dead?" […] Perhaps only the dead know, and only for them is the war over for good.)

Pound, Ezra, Le travail et l'usure: trois essais (Works and Usury: Three Essays)

On table of books at beginning of film. Three lectures on economics originally broadcast on Italian radio in the 1930s.

Proust, Marcel, Jean Santeuil and La prisonnière

Jean Santeuil:

In the film and interviews Godard attributes this to Claude Monet.

Film:
Quand le soleil perçant déjà, la rivière dort encore dans les songes du brouillard, nous ne la voyons pas plus qu’elle ne se voit elle-même. Ici, c’est déjà la rivière, et là la vue est arrêtée, on ne voit plus rien que le néant, une brume qui empêche qu’on ne voie plus loin. A cet endroit de la toile, peindre ni ce qu’on voit puisqu’on ne voit rien, ni ce qu’on ne voit pas puisqu’on ne doit peindre que ce qu’on voit, mais peindre qu’on ne voit pas.

(When - the sun already piercing - the river still sleeping in the dreams of fog, we do not see it anymore than it sees itself. Here it is already the river, and the eye is arrested, one no longer sees anything but a void, a fog which prevents one from seeing farther. In that part of the canvas, one must paint neither what one sees, since one sees nothing, nor what one doesn’t see, since one must paint only what one sees; but to paint what one doesn’t see.

Original:
Quand, le soleil perçant déjà, la rivière dort encore dans les songes du brouillard, nous ne la voyons pas plus qu’elle ne se voit elle-même. Ici c’est déjà la rivière, mais là la vue est arrêtée, on ne voit plus rien que le néant, une brume qui empêche qu’on ne voie plus loin.

A cet endroit de la toile, peindre ni ce qu’on voit parce qu’on ne voit plus rien, ni ce qu’on ne voit pas puisqu’on ne doit peindre que ce qu’on voit, mais peindre qu’on ne voit pas.”

(When - the sun already piercing - the river is still sleeping in the dreams of the fog, we do not see it anymore than it sees itself. Here it is already the river, but the eye is arrested, one no longer sees anything but a void, a fog which prevents one from seeing farther.

In that part of the canvas one must paint neither what one sees, since one sees nothing, nor what one doesn’t see, since one must paint only what one sees; but to paint what one doesn’t see.)

La prisonnière:

Film:
C'est justement parce que cette douceur a été nécessaire pour enfanter la douleur et reviendra du reste la calmer par intermittences que les hommes peuvent être sincères avec autrui et même avec eux-mêmes, quand ils se glorifient de la bonté d'une femme envers eux. Quoique, à tout prendre, au sein de leur liaison circule constamment, d'une façon secrète, inavouée aux autres, ou révélée involontairement par des questions, des enquêtes, une inquiétude douloureuse. Mais celle-ci n'aurait pas pu naître sans la douceur préalable.

(It's because this pain was necessary to give birth to pain and comes back, moreover, to sooth it at times that men can be sincere with others and even with themselves, when they glorify a woman's kindness toward them. Although, all in all at the heart of their liaison circulates, constantly, secretly, unavowed to others or unwittingly revealed by questions, investigations, a painful concern. But this could not have arisen without the previous gentleness.)

Same as original

Rilke, Rainer Maria, Duineser Elegien (Duino Elegies)

Eighth elegy

Film:
Ce qui est au-dehors, ecrivait Rilke, nous ne le savons que par le regard de l’animal.

(What is outside, wrote Rilke, can be known only via an animal's gaze.)

Original:
De tous ses yeux la créature
voit l’Ouvert. Seuls nos yeux
sont comme retournés et posés autour d’elle
tels des pièges pour encercler sa libre issue.
Ce qui est au-dehors nous ne le connaissons
que par les yeux de l’animal. 

(The creature gazes into openness with all
its eyes. But our eyes are
as if they were reversed, and surround it,
everywhere, like barriers against its free passage.
We know what is outside us from the animal's
face alone.)

Sartre, Jean-Paul
, L'être et le néant (Being and Nothingness) and L'âge de raison (The Age of Reason), La Nausée (Nausea
), Le traitre (The Traitor)

L'être et le néant:

Film:
Le philosophe est un être pour lequel il est dans son être question de son être en tant que cet être implique un autre être que lui.

(The philosopher is a being such that in his being, his being is in question in so far as this being implies a being other than himself.)

Original:
...la conscience est un être pour lequel il est dans son être question de son être en tant que cet être implique un être autre que lui.

(…consciousness is a being such that in its being, its being is in question in so far as this being implies a being other than itself.)

L'âge de raison:

Film:
Vous avez renoncée à tous. Faites un pas de plus. Renoncez à la liberté elle-même, et tout vous sera rendu.

(You've given up everything. Take it one step further. Give up freedom itself and everything will be returned to you.)

Original:
Tu as renoncé à tout pour être libre. Fais un pas de plus, renonce à ta liberté elle-même : et tout te sera rendu.

(You've given up everything to be free. Take it one step further, give up your freedom itself: and everything will be returned to you.)

La Nausée

Film:
- Vivre ou raconter.
- Oui. On dit qu’il n’y a pas le choix.

(- To live or to tell.
- Yes. They say there is no choice.)

Original:
Mais il faut choisir : vivre ou raconter.

(But it is necessary to choose: to live or to tell.

Le traitre

Film:
Je déteste les personnages. Dès la naissance on nous prend pour un autre. On le pousse, on le tire, on le force à entrer dans son personnage.

(I hate characters. Ever since birth we're mistaken for another. We push him, we pull him, we force him to get in character.)

Original:
À peine sorti d’un ventre, chaque petit homme est pris pour un autre ; on le pousse, on le tire pour le faire entrer de force dans un personnage, comme ces enfants que les comprachicos tassaient dans des vases de porcelaine pour les empêcher de grandir. 

(Hardly exited from the belly, each little man is mistaken for another; we push him, we pull him to make him get into character, like children that comprachicos squeezed into porcelain vases to prevent them from growing.)

Sand, George, Elle et lui, Lettres à Alfred de Musset

Elle et lui

Film:
Nous ne nous aimons plus. Nous ne nous sommes jamais aimés!

(We love each other no more. We never loved each other!)

Same as original.

Lettres à Alfred de Musset

From two letters.

Film:
Eh bien oui, vous êtes jeune. Vous êtes dans votre beauté, dans votre force. Essayez donc… Moi, je vais mourir. Adieu, adieu, que je ne veux pas vous quitter, je ne veux pas vous reprendre, je ne veux rien, rien, j’ai les genoux par terre, et les reins brisés. Ne me parlez de rien. Vous m’aviez blessée et offensée, et je vous l’avait dit aussi. Nous ne nous aimons plus, nous ne nous sommes jamais aimés.

(You're young, you are a poet, at the height of your beauty and strength. Try then. I am going to die. Farewell, farewell. I do not want to leave you. I do not want to take you back. I want nothing, nothing. I am down on my knees, defeated. We speak about nothing. You hurt and offend me. I'd told you so, as well. We no longer love each other, we never loved each other.)

Original:
1. Eh bien oui, tu es jeune, tu es poète, tu es dans ta beauté et dans ta force. Essaye donc. Moi je vais mourir. Adieu, adieu, je ne veux pas te quitter, je ne veux pas te reprendre, je ne veux rien, rien, j’ai les genoux par terre, et les reins brisés, qu’on ne me parle de rien.

2. Tu m’avais blessée et offensée, et je te l’avais dit aussi: «Nous ne nous aimons plus, nous ne nous sommes pas aimés.»

(1. Well, yes, you're young, you are a poet, at the height of your beauty and strength. Try then. I am going to die. Farwell, farwell, I do not want to leave you, I do not want to take you back, I want nothing, nothing, I am down on my knees, defeated, le I not be spoken to.

2. You hurt and offended me and I had told you so, as well: "We no longer love each other, we never loved each other.")

Shelley, Mary, Frankenstein

Film:

1.
Miserable but I can make you so wretched that the light of day will be hateful to you. You are my creator, but I am your master. Obey!

2.
The hour of my irresolution is past, and the period of your power is arrived. Your threats cannot move me to do an act of wickedness; but they confirm me in the determination of not creating you a companion in vice. Shall I, in cool blood, set loose upon the earth a daemon, whose delight is in death and wretchedness?

Same as original.

Shelley, Percy Bysshe, Peter Bell the Third

There is great talk of Revolution –
And a great chance of Despotism –
German soldiers – camps – confusion –
Tumults – lotteries – rage – delusion

Simak, Clifford D., Time and Again and Demain les chiens (City)

Time and Again:

Film:
L'eau lui parlait d'une voix profonde et grave. Alors Roxy se mit à penser. Elle essaie de me parler. Comme elle a toujours essayé de parler aux gens à travers les âges. Dialoguant avec elle-même quand il n'y a personne pour écouter. Mais qui essaie. Qui essaie toujours de communiquer aux gens les nouvelles qu'elle a à leur donner. Quelques uns d'entre eux ont tiré de la rivière une certaine vérité. 

(The water spoke to him in a deep and serious voice. Roxy began to think. It's trying to talk to me. As it has always tried to talk to people through the ages. Dialoguing with itself when there is no one to listen. But trying. Trying always to communicate to people the news that it has to give them. Some of them have taken from the river a certain truth.)

Original:
The water was warm against his body and it talked to him with a deep, important voice and Sutton thought, it is trying to tell me something, as it has tried to tell the people something all down through the ages. [...] Some of them, perhaps, have grasped a certain truth and a certain philosophy from the river, but none of them have ever reached the meaning of the river's language, for it is an unknown language. 

Demain les chiens:

A novel composed of eight linked short stories, published in 1952.

Film:
Voici les récits que racontent les Chiens quand le feu brule clair et que le vent souffle du nord. La famille alors fait cercle autour du feu. Les jeunes chiots écoutent sans mot dire. Et quand l’histoire est finie, ils posent maintes questions. Qu’est-ce que l’homme ? Qu’est-ce qu’une cité ? Ou encore, qu’est ce que la guerre ?

(Here are the stories Dogs tell when the fire burns clear and the wind blows from the north. The family makes a circle around the fire. The young pups listen without saying a word. And when the story is over, they ask many questions. What is man? What is a city? Or, again, what is war?)

Original:
These are the stories that the Dogs tell when the fires burn high and the wind is from the north. Then each family circle gathers at the hearthstone and the pups sit silently and listen and when the story's done they ask many questions:

"What is Man?" they'll ask.

Or perhaps: "What is a city?"

Or: "What is a war?” 

Siodmak, Robert, Menschen am Sonntag (People on Sunday, 1930)

A scene from the film, a woman being chased through the woods, is shown twice in the film.

Sollers, Philippe, La mutation du suet (Interview with Philippe Forest)

Film
“Commençons par le commencement. L’expérience intérieure est désormais interdite par la société en général et par le spectacle en particulier.”

“Let’s begin at the beginning. Inner experience is henceforth forbidden by society in general and the spectacle in particular.”

Original:
Commençons par le commencement : l’expérience intérieure est désormais interdite. D’une façon drastique, totalitaire par la société en général et par le spectacle en particulier qui avale tout cela pour projeter sans arrêt le sujet dehors et le couper de sa vie intérieure. C’est un programme qui est en cours de façon tout à fait saisissante.

(Let’s begin at the beginning: inner experience is henceforth forbidden. In a drastic manner, totalitarian by society in general and by the spectacle in particular that swallows all of this in order to project the subject outside constantly and cut him off from his inner life. It’s a program that is happening in a very gripping manner.)

Valéry, Paul, Aphorismes

Originally published in La Nouvelle Revue Française, September 1, 1930

Film:
Personne ne pourrait penser librement si ses yeux ne pouvaient quitter d'autres yeux qui les suivraient. Dès que les regards se prennent, on n'est plus tout à fait deux. Il y a de la difficulté de rester seul.

(No one could think freely if his eyes were locked in another's gaze. As soon as gazes lock, there are no longer exactly two of us. Staying alone becomes hard."

Original:
Personne ne pourrait penser librement si ses yeux ne pouvaient quitter d'autres yeux qui les suivraient.

Dès que les regards se prennent, l'on n'est plus tout à fait deux, et il y a de la difficulté à demeurer seul.

(No one could think freely if his eyes were locked in another's gaze. As soon as gazes lock, one is no longer exactly two, and it is hard to remain alone.)

Villon, François, Ballade des pendus (Hanged Man's Ballad)

Film:
Priez Dieu que tous nous vueille absoudre.

(Pray to God that all will be forgiven.)

Same as original

Wittgenstein, Ludwig, Philosophische Untersuchungen (Philosophical Investigations)

Film:
Je peux savoir ce que pense quelqu'un d'autre, mais pas ce que je pense.

(I can know what someone else thinks, but not what I think.)

Same as original.

Music

Bandelli, Alfredo, La caccia alle streghe (The Witch Hunt)

Performed by Pino Masi.
Folk song that opens and closes the film.

Ma oggi ho visto nel corteo
tante facce sorridenti,
le compagne, quindici anni,
gli operai con gli studenti:

"Il potere agli operai!
No alla scuola del padrone!
Sempre uniti vinceremo,
viva la rivoluzione!".

Quando poi le camionette
hanno fatto i caroselli
i compagni hanno impugnato
i bastoni dei cartelli

ed ho visto le autoblindo
rovesciate e...

(But today I have seen marching
so many smiling facing,
comrades, fifteen years,
the workers with the students:

"Power to the workers!
No to the school master!
Always united we win,
long live the revolution!"

Then, when the trucks
have made noise
comrades have challenged
the clubs of cartels

And seen the armored car
overturned and…)

Godard also uses a verse of this song in the trailer and the Khan Khannes video:

La violenza, la violenza,
la violenza, la rivolta;
chi ha esitato questa volta
lotterà con noi domani!

(Violence, violence,
violence, revolt;
he who hesitates this time
will fight with us tomorrow!)

Beethoven, Ludwig van, Symphony no. 7, Second Movement

Kanchelli, Giya, Abii Ne Viderem

Tabakova, Dobrinka, Suite in Old Style Part II

Tchaikovsky, Pytor, Slavic March

Schönberg, Arnold, Transfigured Night

Sibelius, Jean, Symphony No. 2 and Valse triste

Silvestrov, Valentin, Holy God

Very helpful! Good point also about the wrong attribution(s). In one scene a woman in a car references a response made about the French Revolution to Mao Tse Tung, when it was actually made by Chou En Lai.
Great work! Though there are still some gaps. I can add several quotes if you want me to do it. I translated some Godard’s films too.
Please do. Send me an e-mail.
Sorry, I don’t know how to send e-mail on Mubi. I’ll do it right here. 1) Dieu n’ayant pu faire de nous des humbles fait de nous des humiliés ! (Journal de l’écrivain catholique du XXe siècle Julien GREEN, 5 février 1959) Adieu au langage: - Il n’a pas pu faire de nous… Il n’a n’as pas pu faire de nous des humbles. - Qui ça ? - Ou pas su ou pas voulu. Alors il a fait de nous des humiliés. - Qui ça ? - Dieu. 2) “Mais il faut choisir : vivre ou raconter” (SARTRE: La Nausée) Adieu au langage: - Vivre ou raconter. - Oui. On dit qu’il n’y a pas le choix. 3) De tous ses yeux la créature voit l’Ouvert. Seuls nos yeux sont comme retournés et posés autour d’elle tels des pièges pour encercler sa libre issue. Ce qui est au-dehors nous ne le connaissons que par les yeux de l’animal. (RILKE: La Huitième Elégie de Duino) Adieu au langage: Ce qui est au-dehors, ecrivait Rilke, nous ne le savons que par le regard de l’animal. 4) À peine sorti d’un ventre, chaque petit homme est pris pour un autre ; on le pousse, on le tire pour le faire entrer de force dans un personnage, comme ces enfants que les comprachicos tassaient dans des vases de porcelaine pour les empêcher de grandir. (SARTRE: Le Traître: Avant-propos) Adieu au langage: Je déteste les personnages ! Dès la naissance on nous prend pour un autre. On le pousse, on le tire, on le force à entrer dans son personnage. 5) Une femme ne peut pas beaucoup nuire à un grand homme. Il porte en lui-même toute sa tragédie. Elle peut le gêner, l’agacer. Elle peut le tuer. C’est tout. (CHARDONNE: Éva ou Le journal interrompu) Adieu au langage: Une femme ne peut pas faire de mal… Elle peut vous gêner, elle peut vous tuer, c’est tout. 6) L’abstrait c’est facile. C’est le refuge de tous les fainéants. Qui ne travaille pas est pourvu d’idées générales et généreuses. Ce qui est beaucoup plus difficile, c’est de faire rentrer l’abstrait dans le concret. (CELINE: La lettre à Elie Faure, Badgastein, 22 ou 23 juillet 1935) Adieu au langage: Céline disait : «Le difficile c’est de faire rentrer le plat dans la profondeur». 7) Notre histoire est noble et tragique Comme le masque d’un tyran Nul drame hasardeux ou magique Aucun détail indifférent Ne rend notre amour pathétique (APOLLINAIRE – Alcools) Adieu au langage: Cette histoire n’a rien de tragique Ni le rire des géants. Aucun détail indifférent Ne (?) leur amour pathétique. 8) En faisant de la politique un domaine de pensée séparé, les démocraties modernes prédisposent au totalitarisme. (Claude LEFORT cited by Jean-Paul CURNIER in Notre musique) Adieu au langage: Et démocraties modernes qui feront de la politique un domaine de pensée séparé ont predisposé à totalitarisme. 9) In fact, there is no Musset in the film. It’s a letter by George SAND to Musset: Eh bien oui, tu es jeune, tu es poète, tu es dans ta beauté et dans ta force. Essaye donc. Moi je vais mourir. Adieu, adieu, je ne veux pas te quitter, je ne veux pas te reprendre, je ne veux rien, rien, j’ai les genoux par terre, et les reins brisés, qu’on ne me parle de rien. Other letter: Tu m’avais blessée et offensée, et je te l’avais dit aussi: «Nous ne nous aimons plus, nous ne nous sommes pas aimés. Adieu au langage: Eh bien oui, vous êtes jeune. Vous êtes dans votre beauté, dans votre force. Essayez donc… Moi, je vais mourir. Adieu, adieu, que je ne veux pas vous quitter, je ne veux pas vous reprendre, je ne veux rien, rien, j’ai les genoux par terre, et les reins brisés. Ne me parlez de rien. Vous m’aviez blessée et offensée, et je vous l’avait dit aussi: “Nous ne nous aimons plus, nous ne nous sommes jamais aimés.”
Oh, I haven’t noticed that there is one more quote from The Possessed which is missing. In fact, “c’est ce que disait Kiriloff” relates not to “‘il faut partir d’en bas” but to “Deux questions : une grande et une petite. Mais la petite est grande aussi.” The text of Dostoyevsky (from french translaion) is following: - Je… je ne le sais pas encore bien… deux préjugés les arrêtent, deux choses ; il n’y en a que deux, l’une est fort insignifiante, l’autre très sérieuse. Mais la première ne laisse pas elle-même d’avoir beaucoup d’importance. - Quelle est-elle ? - La souffrance. - La souffrance ? Est-il possible qu’elle joue un si grand rôle… dans ce cas ? - Le plus grand. Il faut distinguer : il y a des gens qui se tuent sous l’influence d’un grand chagrin, ou par colère ou parce qu’ils sont fous, ou parce que tout leur est égal. Ceux-là se donnent la mort brusquement et ne pensent guère à la souffrance. Mais ceux qui se suicident par raison y pensent beaucoup. […] - Eh bien, et la seconde cause, celle que vous avez déclarée sérieuse ? - C’est l’autre monde. - C’est-à-dire la punition ? - Cela, ce n’est rien. L’autre monde tout simplement. Adieu au langage: - C’est ce que disait Kiriloff : «Deux questions : une grande et une petite. Mais la petite est grande aussi». - C’est quoi la petite ? - La souffrance. - Et la grande ? - L’autre monde. L’autre monde. Sorry Ted, since I don’t know how to send a PM here, could you write me yourself?
Wow! Thank you so much, it is incredible! I heard from Russian director Artur Aristakisyan that the image from his films PALMS (1994) was used in the beginning, but, I guess, it needs to double-check this information.
Yes, Borya, it was. Sorry Ted, I forgot to mention it.This one – http://postimg.org/image/fkla0xzgb/ There is also a shot from the People on Sunday by Robert Siodmak: a man chasing a girl through a forest (it appears twice in the film).
Adding to the citations, I noticed that the audio from the popular YouTube video “Husky sings with baby” plays over the end credits. Here’s the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nyk1HXvCNks&app=desktop. And an interpretation: as one of Godard’s concerns is the barrier language erects between humans and the world around them, the sounds of a baby and a dog singing together nicely affirms that only by saying, yes, “goodbye to language,” can humans overcome that barrier.
I don’t know what the exact wording in the film is, but Roxy’s musings on the knowledge of the river tracks pretty closely with the song “Ole Man River” from SHOW BOAT.
Thank you all very much for this list!

Please to add a new comment.

Previous Features