For a better experience on MUBI, update your browser.

Rushes. Louis C.K., Netflix vs. Film History, Twin Peaks Finale

This week’s essential news, articles, sounds, videos and more from the film world.
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.
RECOMMENDED VIEWING
  • In remembrance of Hans Hurch, Abel Ferrara has produced a touching trailer for the upcoming Viennale.
  • Louis C.K. discusses his new film I Love You, Daddy at TIFF. Read our review of the film.
RECOMMENDED READING
  • Francis Ford Coppola's maligned masterpiece The Cotton Club has been renewed in the form of The Cotton Club Encore, and it's "one of the best movies ever made by anybody, anywhere, anytime" for Jim Hemphill of Talkhouse.
"Netflix’s selection of classic cinema is abominable—and it seems to shrink more every year or so. As of this month, the streaming platform offers just 43 movies made before 1970, and fewer than 25 from the pre-1950 era (several of which are World War II documentaries). It’s the sort of classics selection you’d expect to find in a decrepit video store in 1993, not on a leading entertainment platform that serves some 100 million global subscribers."
  • Zach Schonfeld assesses Netflix's neglect for the history of cinema at Newsweek.
Dmitry Golotyuk: So, you still haven’t “mounted” [monté] anything for your new film?

Jean-Luc Godard: Here — I’m starting to. After: what I call a scenario idea, a sketch [attempt/tentative] of the scenario, but which is done only with photos, if you will. Once, they came often. I know that for his first films in America, Fritz Lang made reports about the region or about other stuff, then the scenario came. But he didn’t try to write anything. Maybe, rather like a musician, if you will, who works at his piano before writing his symphony, because when he writes, he writes. That’s why I’ve always really liked free-jazz without really being able to stand it. But because nothing was written out.
  • Over at Cinemasparagus, Craig Keller has provided a thorough translation of excerpts from the latest interview with Jean-Luc Godard concerning the state of cinema and his forthcoming The Image-Book (Image et Parole).
  • David Auerbach offers a carefully considered new theory on the fervently discussed new season of Twin Peaks.
  • At Pitchfork, David Lynch reflects on the expansive selection of music utilized in the new season.
"'Apichatpong Weerasethakul: The Serenity of Madness,' an exhibition currently on display at the School of the Art Institute's Sullivan Galleries, not only is a beautiful collection of video installations and still images, but provides new insight into the career of one of the most important filmmakers working today. The content of "Serenity" might be described as the interstices of Weerasethakul's filmmaking career, with video diaries, short films, and photographs that meditate on themes and images elaborated on in the Thai director's features. Meditate is the operative word—like Weerasethakul's movies, "Serenity" offers a calm, immersive space where one can contemplate notions of spirituality, romance, war, and death." 
  • Ben Sachs for The Chicago Reader covers an essential Apichatpong Weerasethakul exhibition and retrospective now ongoing in Chicago.
"Petzold’s oeuvre lends itself not only to thinking, from a more or less auteurist perspective, about its internal development but also to reflecting more broadly on the possibilities for narrative cinema in the age of 'post-cinema.' This multifaceted positionality of his work results in part from how his films self-consciously aim to occupy one of the most fragile of artistic positions, namely, the very tipping point where a joyful affirmation of narrative, indeed genre, filmmaking is tenuously counter-balanced with a rather austere – or, as Christoph Hochhäusler puts it in his contribution herein, 'protestant' – insistence on a rigorously intellectual and political approach to the medium."
  • At Senses of Cinema, Marco Abel and Jaimey Fisher introduce an ambitious dossier on the great Christian Petzold.
EXTRAS

Please to add a new comment.

Latest News