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Rushes. Kiarostami's Coda, The Zanzibar Group, Buster Keaton Candid Camera

This week’s essential news, articles, sounds, videos and more from the film world.
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.
  • Janus Films has released a moving trailer for the late master Abbas Kiarostami's final film, 24 Frames. We were touched by this entrancing film at this past year's Cannes Film Festival.
  • Steven Soderbergh's post-"retirement" phase appears to continue with Unsane. Here's the first tantalizing trailer:
  • Travis Wilkerson is one of the best kept secrets in American cinema, thus we're pleased to see that his latest Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? gets a trailer and distribution via Grasshopper Film:
  • The kind people over at NoBudge have presented the online premieres of two inspired independent films: Kat Hunt's What's Revenge, a docu-fiction comedy about ex-boyfriends and gender relations, and Eric Marsh & Andrew Stasiulis' Orders, a contemplation of the American war machine from a haunted suburban setting.
  • The Directors Guild of America's podcast Directors Cut has shared a rare communion of two contemporaries. Director Ridley Scott discusses his latest act of romantic cynicism, All the Money in the World, with American auteur Michael Mann.
  • Sofia Coppola looks back on the experience of making her landmark debut The Virgin Suicides in a reflective and insightful piece for The Guardian.
  • In the event of TIFF's Philippe Garrel retrospective, Andréa Picard reflects upon "a little-known chapter in the history of French cinema": the Zanzibar group.
  • With I, Daniel Blake heading to the Criterion Collection, Girish Shambu, one of our favorite critics, has thoughtfully considered the Palme d'Or winner and its surprising political reception:
  • "Art cinema so rarely finds itself at the heart of public debate. When it does, the focus—as with a film such as Nagisa Oshima’s In the Realm of the Senses (1976) or Catherine Breillat’s Fat Girl (2001)—is usually the censure or banning of a work for sexually transgressive content. But it is uncommon for a movie that describes normal, everyday life, as I, Daniel Blake does, to spark passionate public discourse, and so, when that happened in Great Britain upon that film’s release in 2016, it was a surprise."
  • Ahead of MoMA & Martin Scorsese's Republic Rediscovered series (starting tomorrow!), Screen Slate has interviewed filmmaker, video archivist, and Notebook contributor Gina Telaroli about the series which she assisted in putting together.
  • Closing out our MUBI Jerrython, we've re-published an interview between Jerry Lewis and the Documentary Film Group from the University of Chicago circa 1971.
  • Elena Lazic considers how In Bed with Victoria (which is now showing on MUBI!) subverts and undermines the familiarity of the French sex comedy.
  • Martin Kudlac's piece on Samira Elagoz' Craigslist Allstars analyzes the intersection between fiction, documentary, and performance art.
  • Via Notebook contributor Ignatiy Vishnevesty, a hilarious early candid camera broadcast featuring a precisely bumbling Buster Keaton.

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