Cannes 2013. Festival Favorites

Adam Cook:

FAVORITES

01

The Immigrant (James Gray, USA)
Les trois désastres (Jean-Luc Godard, France/Portugal)

02


North, the End of History (Lav Diaz, Philippines)
Shield of Straw (Takashi Miike, Japan)
Stranger by the Lake (Alain Guiraudie, France)

03

Bastards (Claire Denis, France/Germany)
Blind Detective (Johnnie To, Hong Kong)
Behind the Candelabra (Steven Soderbergh, USA)
A Touch of Sin (Jia Zhangke, China)

04

The Missing Picture (Rithy Panh, Cambodia/France)
The Bling Ring (Sofia Coppola, USA)
Like Father, Like Son (Hirokazu Koreeda, Japan)
Tip Top (Serge Bozon, France)
Grigris (Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, France/Chad)

THE REST

You and the Night (Yann Gonzalez, France)
Borgman (Alex van Warmerdam, Netherlands)
Nebraska (Alexander Payne, USA)
Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel & Ethan Coen, USA)
The Past (Asghar Farhadi, France/Italy)
Bends (Flora Lau, Hong Kong/China)
Jimmy P. (Arnaud Desplechin, USA)
Grand Central (Rebecca Zlotowski, France/Austria)
Just in Time (Peter Greenaway, UK/Portugal)
Only Lovers Left Alive
 (Jim Jarmusch, USA)

LEAST FAVORITE
Cinesapiens (Edgar Pêra, Portugal)
Miele (Valeria Golino, Italy/France)
Heli (Amat Escalante, Mexico)
Only God Forgives (Nicolas Winding Refn, France/Denmark)

Daniel Kasman:

FAVORITES

01

Les trois désastres (Jean-Luc Godard, France/Portugal)
The Last of the Unjust (Claude Lanzmann, France/Austria)
North, the End of History (Lav Diaz, Philippines)
The Immigrant (James Gray, USA) 

02

Blind Detective (Johnnie To, Hong Kong)
Stranger by the Lake (Alain Guiraudie, France)
A Touch of Sin (Jia Zhangke, China)
The Missing Picture (Rithy Panh, Cambodia/France)
Bastards (Claire Denis, France/Germany)
La danza de la realidad (Alejandro Jodorowsky, Chile) 

03

Like Father, Like Son (Hirokazu Koreeda, Japan)
Tip Top (Serge Bozon, France)
Real (Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Japan) 

04

Behind the Candelabra (Steven Soderbergh, USA)
Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch, USA)
Ugly (Anurag Kashyap, India)

THE REST

Jimmy P. (Arnaud Desplechin, USA)
Un voyageur (Marcel Ophüls, France)
Nebraska (Alexander Payne, USA)
Just in Time (Peter Greenaway, UK/Portugal)
Shield of Straw (Takashi Miike, Japan)
Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel & Ethan Coen, USA)
The Bling Ring (Sofia Coppola, USA)
Cinesapiens (Edgar Pêra, Portugal)
The Past (Asghar Farhadi, France/Italy)
Grand Central (Rebecca Zlotowski, France/Austria)

LEAST FAVORITE 

Grigris (Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, France/Chad)
Heli (Amat Escalante, Mexico)
Death March (Adolfo Alix, Jr.)
Only God Forgives (Nicolas Winding Refn, France/Denmark)

Responses

38 responses to this post.  Join the discussion

  • Assemism

    I don’t understand, neither of you mentions Palme d’Or winner “Blue Is The Warmest Color” in any category???

  • Adam Cook

    Tipped off by some colleagues we trust that it wasn’t a “must-see”, it was actually a film we both missed out on in favour of other options. We’ll catch up with it when we can, though just cause it won the Palme doesn’t make us all that choked up about having neglected it.

  • Bobby Wise

    So I guess the question is do you trust those colleagues any more if a film they said was not a “must-see” turns out to win the biggest award in the world of cinema? But I’m not mad at you. Godard, Jarmusch, and the Coens (maybe even Coppola) are not to be missed. In your shoes I probably also would have passed on Keciche.

  • White Cobra

    Go to Cannes. Do not see the Palme D’Or winner. That is grade-A coverage right there folks.

  • .

    That’s a great attitude to have, Adam. Maybe if you guys were familiar with Kechiche’s earlier films, especially L’Esquive, you would have made a point to see this competition selection.

  • David Phelps

    After Black Venus, many thanks for not wasting precious time/coverage on Kechiche!

  • Adam Cook

    One can’t see everything. One can’t predict the Palme. In candor, we did try to catch its repeat screening but its running time made it logistically difficult…

  • Nathan Letore

    “So I guess the question is do you trust those colleagues any more if a film they said was not a “must-see” turns out to win the biggest award in the world of cinema?”

    “Go to Cannes. Do not see the Palme D’Or winner. That is grade-A coverage right there folks.”

    Considering that the quality of a film more often than not has little correlation with what awards it might get, considering that (one of) the critic’s tasks is precisely to see through the buzz and hype of institutions that have a stake in self-congratulation, and considering that Kechiche is a not-bad director whose absurd over-rating is a sign of just how empty mainstream French film culture has become (once, he would have rated a mention as promising but limited; now, he is upheld as the brightest flag-bearer of national filmic culture and a beacon of hope for the future) – given all these, I can’t say I resent Adam Cook and Daniel Kasman.

  • .

    Great post, David.

  • Nicole B

    Going by Adam’s and Daniel’s track records when it comes to watching films, yes, I think these colleagues can be trusted. And why is the Palme d’Or an automatic predictor of quality? Didn’t Amour just win last year?

    After Black Venus, yes, I would definitely skip the Kechiche, although I still am
    Interested in seeing it at some point. It just isn’t a matter of urgency.

  • Bobby Wise

    I don’t resent them either, but it is a bit of a journalistic snafu to have two correspondents both miss the top film at the top festival. And there were no articles run on the film by other associates either. Just a blank space and a wall of silence. MUBI Notebook is getting too big to accommodate errors like that.

  • pleung2046

    Palme d’Or usually gets a commercial release, no need to see it at Cannes. :p

  • Nicole B

    Top film is entirely subjective, and Mubi is not Variety or the Hollywood Reporter. The primary reason why I as a reader often visit this site is that it is an alternative to mainstream film journalism. That’s the way it started, and that’s the direction I hope it continues in. I’m here to read about Rithy Panh and Jodorowsky and smaller, less-known films and filmmakers. If you want to read about Kechiche, then IMDB is just a click away.

    I dread the day that Mubi is called upon to discuss every hyped and “prestige” film in the name of “journalistic integrity”.

  • Bobby Wise

    I don’t think covering a three-hour lesbian love story from a previously relatively unheralded director makes you mainstream (didn’t know the film was hyped and considered prestige either). It’s not a question of integrity, Notebook critics snapping pics on the red carpet, asking about girl-on-girl French kissing at the press conference, or any of that stuff. We’re still talking about insightful alternative film criticism. I should have read about Kechiche in Notebook festival coverage before he won the Palme. Moot point now and maybe he is too mainstream post-Cannes. Let’s go back to reading about Bay, Mann, Scott, and Hyams. I need more alternative in my life!

  • Nicole B

    Treating Bay, Mann, Scott, and Hyams seriously as auteurs definitely strikes me as an alternative approach. And showing an auteurist interest in directors ranging from the commercial to the avant-garde without intellectual snobbery veers away from the predilections of mainstream film journalism.

    Kechiche has long been a critical darling of the European press thanks to The Secret of the Grain. He has even won several Cesar awards! He’s probably only unheralded to American journalists. He was undoubtedly mainstream pre-Palme d’Or.

  • Quentin Carbonell

    The boys will cover the Kechiche some day, it is not mandatory to go for it in Cannes nor possible to see everything. Anyway, it’s not like Palme d’Or sounds like “quality” or even “interesting”.

    I have seen the Kechiche, and can only approve David Phelps’ comment. It is a film that would have anyway made a lot of fuss, even without the Palme, and it would be a shame to loose so much time right now on this matter while so many great films were also shown there and can give birth to amazing discussions.

  • Daniel Kasman

    Frankly we couldn’t fit it in our schedule, just like we couldn’t schedule a couple other films in Competition. As luck would have it, the film won. That being said, I didn’t like Kechiche’s last two films so there wasn’t much impetus to make this screening until it won (after which we were home).

  • Daniel Kasman

    (And thanks for the support and reading, everyone!)

  • Ryan Meehan

    lotta people griping about movies they haven’t seen yet

  • annahara

    http://www.todaslascriticas.com.ar/cannes
    Well, i’m just so curious when reading these opinions of all film critics in Spain and some abroad… It doesn’t seem like a stupid movie, la vie d’adèle, so far….How can a film achieve such a consensus? Seems almost impossible to me! Only this makes it so interesting to see. It’d have been great to read your opinions here, too, though.

  • Dennis...Brian

    no one saw Max Rose?

    You are in France and missed the Lewis options, that breaks my heart

  • The Future Mr. Gitts

    Anyone who thinks (a) “[Kechiche] was undoubtedly mainstream pre-Palme d’Or,” (b) Jodorowsky is a lesser-known filmmaker, and © treating Michael Mann as an auteur is an alternative approach is clearly out of touch with reality.

  • Nathan Letore

    I can’t presume to know whether Mademoiselle (Madame?) Nicole B is french or not, but let me assure you that in France, anyone with even a passing interest in cinema would have heard of Kechiche before the festival. Les Inrocks, one of France’s most popular cultural magazines, has made him a critical darling for a while now.
    As to you points B and C, Nicole is more than able to defend herself, but I shall confirm that Kechiche is indeed more famous than Jodorowsky in France (for once, IMHO, rightly so), and that it’s not quite fair of your point C to only quote one of the four directors she named from the mainstream.

  • The Future Mr. Gitts

    Ok, I can understand that perspective for French filmgoers. Though on a global scale, Kechiche is still under the radar (at least pre-Palme d’Or), and Jodorowsky is still more widely known, for better or worse. In any case, I am inclined to agree with Bobby Wise—I don’t think it’s unreasonable to expect coverage and discussion of the Palme d’Or winner here.

  • Nicole B

    Thanks for replying, Nathan. I didn’t really feel up to responding to an ad hominem attack.

    Besides, I said Jodorowsky AND smaller, lesser-known films and filmmakers, both separated by AND, meaning Jodorowsky doesn’t necessarily belong to the latter group. Of course Jodorowsky is more known in America. Should I also point out that I mentioned “critical darling of the European press”?

    Anyway, I didn’t expect Kechiche to be discussed here in Mubi. No one’s really championed him.

  • Daniel Kasman

    @Dennis Brian: they canceled the press screening at the last minute.

  • Bingham Bryant

    Mr. Kasman, care to share any thoughts on Kurosawa’s Real? I didn’t think it was playing at Cannes, and I haven’t found any coverage of the film elsewhere, but I’m very curious after that wonderful trailer. Is it anything like a return to form after his long absence from cinemas and the lackluster Penance?

  • Daniel Kasman

    @Bingham: it was shown in the market, not in the festival proper. I liked Penance better (but I am a fan of Penance). A lot of dream with a dream things (KK’s micro-emotional Inception, in a way). Very stultified / hypnotized tone. Shock of a finale (don’t want to give it away).

  • Matt Kelemen

    Things work out that way on the ground at festivals sometimes. They missed the Palm d’Or winner and consequently were able to tell visitors about one or two more films that might have been that much less noticed.

    And I have to see Heli now.

  • Bingham Bryant

    @Daniel. Sounds terrific (but I am a fan of Inception). Kurosawa’s at his best sleepwalking (or hypnotized). Btw, I wouldn’t say Penance was bad, I just thought KK’s textures took a hit from the digital, TV soap production values, and that his narratives usually offer more surprising pleasures than the regular rationing out of twists and character history that the medium tends to get stuck into. The cast and the last episode make up for a lot though.

  • Daniel Kasman

    @Matt Thanks! I’d suggest avoiding Heli, though.

    @Bingham I thought he had more narrative freedom to expand and contract in the television format, which I found interesting even if a few of the episodes were weak. His work does look a bit different in digital but he came from a video background and I think it works with his aesthetic. I know many who were disappointed though, so I get it.

  • ULA ZUHRA

    ?!!!! why didn’t you see The Warmest Color i dont GET IT.

  • ULA ZUHRA

    i mean, because i’d love to hear your opinion on it..yknow..

  • Rasotis

    What the hell are you talking about? I haven’t seen any of Kechiche films, but after the Palme i really would like to. Sure, as someone mentioned here, it doesn’t mean that the film is awesome because it won awards but treating a director as mainstream after he received good press is idiotic. I always thought mainstream films are the shallow, simplistic ones, that need to make EVERYONE happy, those that that aren’t personal. What do good reviews have to do with it? Could you please explain this to me?

  • PurplePavot

    Haha so much hate for Only God Forgives. I did enjoy it thoroughly – and I DID hate “drive”.

    I really like this list because I was in Cannes too and I got to see pretty much ALL the other films which are not cited here.

    I am rather disappointed though that Adam Cook and Daniel Kasman have got a worryingly homogeneous preference in films.

    I guess it’s what they call “editorial line”.

    P.S: Godard’s Three Disasters is a masterpiece, a thorn in the ‘eye’ of senses and intellect.

  • Bobby Wise

    I was just worried that they went to screenings hand-in-hand rather than trying to divvy up duties!

  • Adam Cook

    Well, I fear hand-in-hand wasn’t a possibility as Mr. Kasman’s pink badge places him above me in the wonderful hierarchy of Cannes attendees. One day I’ll have the pink badge…one day…

  • Quentin Carbonell

Your opinion

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